Archive for the ‘Volunteer’ Category

A Day on the Land

By
August 5th, 2013



A team of volunteers from HMSA helped clean graffiti off of stone bridges in Moanalua Valley as part of The Trust for Public Land's community work day Saturday. Courtesy photo.

A team of volunteers from HMSA helped clean graffiti off of stone bridges in Moanalua Valley as part of The Trust for Public Land's community work day Saturday. Courtesy photo.

More than 100 volunteers joined The Trust for Public Land for its community workday in Moanalua Valley on Saturday.

They cleared trails of leaves, branches and muddy debris strewn by recent high winds and rain, spread gravel along trail paths and painted over graffiti on stone bridges. It was all a part of "A Day on the Land," an effort to preserve an important, natural habitat with a rich, cultural heritage.

About 50 HECO volunteers helped spread gravel along the trail in Moanalua Valley as part of community work day. Courtesy photo.

HECO brought about 50 volunteers to help spread gravel along the trail in Moanalua Valley. Courtesy photo.

Volunteers braved both humidity and mosquitoes during their efforts Saturday.

The work day was sponsored by companies including Alaska Airlines, Alexander & Baldwin, Central Pacific Bank, First Insurance Co. of Hawaii, the Hawaiian Electric Co., HMSA, Makai Ocean Engineering, Servco Foundation and Title Guaranty.

HECO brought about 50 volunteers, some of whom brought their families, to the community work day. It was an opportunity to work side-by-side with the community and hike into areas of Moanalua Valley that are rarely accessible to the public, said HECO's director of education and consumer affairs Ka‘iulani de Silva.

Moanalua Valley is one of the last, truly open spaces in urban Honolulu (which narrowly escaped becoming a potential corridor for the H-3 freeway as well as residential development). It's home to five distinct forest types and more than nine miles of streams. The valley is  a critical habitat for endangered plants and animals, including the elepaio, and home to cultural important sites including a famed pohaku (stone) carved with petroglyphs of winged warriors.

The Trust for Public Land purchased Moanalua Valley in 2007 and transferred it to the state's Forest Reserve system where it will be protected in perpetuity.

More than 100 volunteers showed up to help at the Trust for Public Land's A Day on the Land at Moanalua Valley. Courtesy photo.

More than 100 volunteers showed up to help at the Trust for Public Land's A Day on the Land at Moanalua Valley. Courtesy photo.

Linda Howe from A & B helps clean graffiti from a bridge at Moanalua Valley as part of The Trust for Public Land's community work day. Courtesy photo.

Linda Howe from A & B helps clean graffiti from a bridge at Moanalua Valley as part of The Trust for Public Land's community work day. Courtesy photo. To learn of more community workdays, visit www.tpl.org/hawaii or call 524-8694.

Volunteers from HECO lent a helping hand at a Day on the Land in Moanalua Valley. Courtesy photo.

Volunteers from HECO lent a helping hand at a Day on the Land in Moanalua Valley. Courtesy photo.

Posted in Volunteer | Comments Off on A Day on the Land

Volunteering for the aina

By
June 19th, 2013



HECO volunteers participate in a four-hour workday helping to plant a rare type of banana tree in He‘eia for the non-profit group Papahana Kuaola. Photo courtesy HECO.

HECO volunteers participate in a four-hour workday helping to plant a rare type of banana tree in He‘eia for the non-profit group Papahana Kuaola. Photo courtesy HECO.

How about  a day working on the aina?

That's what some 200 volunteers from Hawaiian Electric Co. did earlier this month at Papahana Kuaola on their 70-acre kauhale in He‘eia on the windward side.

Papahana Kuaola is a 501(c)(3) non-profit whose mission is to create quality educational programs focused on environmental restoration and economic sustainability "fully integrated with Hawaiian knowledge in order to exemplify a lifestyle respectful of kanaka, aina and akua."

HECO volunteers spent the four-hour workday helping to plant banana trees, remove weeds, gather and debark guava wood for construction of  building frames plus bundle pili grass for roof thatching. They also worked in the lo‘i, or taro patch.

"More importantly than what we are doing here physically on the land, is what all the people who participate get out of it," said Matt Schirman, program director for Papahana Kualoa. "Getting people outdoors in the environment in a place that makes them feel relaxed and welcome — it has a really good effect o people. It's a kind of feeling that I think more and more people need today especially with this fast-paced lifestyle that we have."

The newly constructed gardens by HECO volunteers will help extremely rare types of banana trees thrive, and the guava and pil grass bundles will become part of two "hale pili" where the community will be able to gather.

To learn more about volunteering, visit www.papahanakualoa.com.

Posted in Conservation, Volunteer | Comments Off on Volunteering for the aina

Kakaako Beach Butt-Clearing

By
March 28th, 2013



The Surfrider Foundation hosts a beach cleanup at Point Panic at Kakaako Beach Park this Saturday (March 30) with a focus on cleaning up cigarette butts. Photo from planetearthandhumanity.blogspot.com.

The Surfrider Foundation hosts a beach cleanup at Point Panic at Kakaako Beach Park this Saturday (March 30) with a focus on cleaning up cigarette butts. Photo from planetearthandhumanity.blogspot.com.

The Surfrider Foundation hosts a "butt-clearing" and beach cleanup Saturday morning (March 30) at Point Panic at Kakaako.

Meet at Point Panic at 10 a.m. Look for flags and tents opposite the Kewalo Marine Laboratory.

This months' beach cleanups is focused on cleaning up cigarette butts, one of the most common items littered along the coastline. Volcano E-Cigs is offering the Surfrider Foundation 5 cents for each butt collected. Visit www.cigarettelitter.org to read published research about how cigarette butts cause harm to aquatic life.

Honolulu City Council, meanwhile, passed  Bill 72, which bans smoking at most East Oahu beaches, including Kapiolani Park, Kuhio Beach Park, Duke Kahanamoku Beach Park, Sandy Beach Park and the beach side of Ala Moana Regional Park. The bill now goes to Mayor Kirk Caldwell for his signature.

The beach cleanup will tally up the items cleared from the coastline, followed by lunch provided by Blue Tree Cafe.

If you miss this beach cleanup, Divas Doing Good, the non-profit arm of Eden in Love and The Wedding Cafe at Ward Warehouse, has organized another one at Kakaako Beach Park from 9:30 to 11 a.m. on Saturday, April 6. There'll be games, prizes and all ages are welcome. Please RSVP by April 1 to shop@edeninlove.com.

Posted in Green events, Ocean, Volunteer | Comments Off on Kakaako Beach Butt-Clearing

North Shore Cleanup Saturday

By
February 28th, 2013



Join Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii for a beach cleanup on the North Shore Saturday (March 2). Meet at Turtle Bay Resort's West Lawn. Photo from sustainablecoastlineshawaii.org.

Join Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii for a beach cleanup on the North Shore Saturday (March 2). Meet at Turtle Bay Resort's West Lawn. Photo from sustainablecoastlineshawaii.org.

Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii is hosting a North Shore beach clean up from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday (March 2). Meet at the West Lawn at Turtle Bay Resort and follow the blue flags. The general public as well as participants of Wanderlust Oahu Festival (a four-day yoga and music event) are welcome to attend.

Shuttles will transport volunteer teams to Kahuku Golf Course Beach and Kahuku Point at the James Campbell Wildlife Refuge to collect microplastics to be recycled by Method Home.

The whole family is welcome to participate. Some fun games include a hunt for hidden glass bottles during the cleanup to win prizes, including tickets to the evening Wanderlust concert featuring ALO and Kaki King, plus day passes to Sunday festival activities, as well as kids' clothing from Patagonia, Hurley and Quiksilver.

Water, a snack, gloves, tally sheets and other cleanup materials will be provided.

For more information, visit sustainablecoastlinesshawaii.org.

Posted in Green events, marine debris, Uncategorized, Volunteer | Comments Off on North Shore Cleanup Saturday

Whale count: 267 on Saturday

By
January 28th, 2013



Volunteers help count humpback whales from Lanikai for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Ocean Count. Photo by Gosia Thomas.

Volunteers help count humpback whales from Lanikai for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Ocean Count. Photo by Gosia Thomas.

The humpback whales are here. More than 800 volunteers gathered data from the shores of Oahu, Kauai and Hawaii island during the annual Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Ocean Count on Saturday.

This year's design features a compilation of student artwork from the Sanctuary's Ocean Contest.

This year's design features a compilation of student artwork from the Sanctuary's Ocean Contest.

A total of 267 whales were seen between 11:30 to 11:45 a.m. on Saturday. Volunteers collected data from 59 sites statewide. Weather conditions were ideal for viewing humpback whales, with the exception of vog.

Preliminary data of whale sightings by site location is available at www.sanctuaryoceancounot.org/resources. The highest number of whales were seen from the shores of Kakaako, Magic Island and Diamond Head.

Two more Sanctuary ocean counts take place on Saturdays, Feb. 23 and March 30.

Visit sanctuaryoceancount.org for more information on becoming a volunteer or call 1-888-55-WHALE ext. 253.

By the way, if you're interested in buying a T-shirt to support the Sanctuary, this year's design is a compilation of student artwork from the Sanctuary's Ocean Contest.

Visit the NMSF Sanctuary Store to purchase the limited edition T-shirts, which are available with short sleeves or long sleeves for adults, and in youth sizes. All proceeds benefit the Sanctuary.

Posted in Conservation, Marine Life, Volunteer | Comments Off on Whale count: 267 on Saturday

Volunteer for the Aina

By
January 14th, 2013



Pouhala Marsh is an important habitat for many native birds. Photo by Nathan Yuen, hawaiianforest.com.

Pouhala Marsh is an important habitat for many native birds. Here, ae‘o circle over the marsh. Help the Hawai‘i Nature Center clean up the marsh this month. Photo by Nathan Yuen, hawaiianforest.com.

Happy New Year!

If you are interested in volunteer opportunities that connect you with the aina, here are two great local opportunities:

>> Honouliuli Shoreline Service Project: The Hoakalei Foundation is hosting One‘ula, a Honouliuli Shoreline Service Project on Saturday, Jan. 26. Instead of lugging car parts, tires and construction debris, volunteers will focus on cleaning up small debris including plastic, glass, metal and litter that can easily be bagged for pickup at day's end. Volunteers will also be able to learn and explore some of the cultural heritage of the land and shoreline resources. Gloves and bags will be provided, along with water and lunch afterwards at about noon. Meet at 8 a.m. at the west side of One‘ula Beach Park. To pre-register or learn more, email kepa@hoakaleifoundationn,org or call 563-0787.

>> Pouhala Marsh wetland restoration: Help the Hawai‘i Nature Center with the cleanup and restoration of Pouhala Marsh in Waipahu. This 70-acre marsh is used for Hawai‘i Nature Center educational programs and is currently the largest remaining wetland habitat in Pearl Harbor. Service projects are scheduled from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. on Saturdays, Jan. 26, Feb. 23, March 23, April 27, May 25 and June 22. Volunteers should bring work gloves, a hat, sunscreen and  water and expect to get muddy. HNC will provide snacks and juice. To sign up or learn more, contact the center's volunteer program manager Pauline Kawamato at 955-0100 ext. 118 or volunteer@hawaiinaturecenter.org.

Posted in Conservation, Volunteer | Comments Off on Volunteer for the Aina

Da Hui North Shore Cleanup & Kanikapila

By
November 3rd, 2012



Hawaii green sea turtles on the North Shore are among marine mammals threatened by plastic litter on the shores. Photo by Nina Wu.

Hawaii green sea turtles on the North Shore are among marine mammals threatened by plastic litter on the shores. Photo by Nina Wu.

Surfers and non-surfers alike, mark your calendars for the "Da Hui North Shore Beach Clean Up" on Saturday, Nov. 10.

Check-in time is 8 a.m. at Turtle Bay Resort, where different groups will then be shuttled to various zones for the beach cleanup and treasure hunt scheduled between 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Enjoy a free barbecue and live music afterwards at about 11 a.m. from Mike Love, Paula Fuga and other bands, plus a pro-surf autograph session at 12:30 p.m.

Da Hui (short for Hui O He‘e Nalu) teams up with Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii for the clean up, as well as the Kokua Hawaii Foundation, Eddie Aikau Foundation and Surfrider Foundation, Oahu Chapter.

Quiksilver, Hurley, Volcom, Oakley and others are sponsoring the event.

All debris collected from the  beach cleanup will be tallied and reported to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Hard plastics will also go to Method to be transformed into recycled packaging. Method recently came out with the first bottles made from a blend of plastic debris collected from Oahu's shores for its dish + hand soap, available at Whole Foods Market.

Posted in Green events, marine debris, Ocean, Volunteer | Comments Off on Da Hui North Shore Cleanup & Kanikapila

Kailua cleanup: 11,306 pieces of microplastic

By
October 1st, 2012



Volunteers scour Kailua beach for marine debris and litter, including microplastics, cigarette butts and bottle caps during a beach cleanup for International Coastal Cleanup Day on Sept. 15. Photo courtesy of Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii.

Volunteers scour Kailua beach for marine debris and litter, including microplastics, cigarette butts and bottle caps during a beach cleanup for International Coastal Cleanup Day on Sept. 15. Photo courtesy of Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii.

Pieces of microplastic surpassed the number of cigarette butts in Sustainable Coastline Hawaii's latest tally of its beach cleanup at Kailua and Lanikai (including the  Mokoluas & Flat Island) on Sept. 15, International Coastal Cleanup Day.

Some 700 volunteers on that Saturday picked up an estimated:

>> 11,306 pieces of microplastic

>> 8,891 cigarette butts

>> 2,563 Styrofoam cps and containers

>> 2,146 food and candy wrappers

>> 1,533 caps, lids and tops

>> 1,385 non-nylon rope and net

>> 945 bottle  caps

>> 868 glass bottles

>> 717 rubber pieces

>> 677 plastic bags

>> 655 fishing nets/rope

>> 522 aluminum cans

>> Volunteers also picked up 462  beverage bottles, 450 large pieces of plastic, 342 personal care products, 231 utensils, 159 pieces of clothing/shoes, 108 toys, 31 lighters and 11 tires.

When volunteers participate in a beach cleanup, they also fill out tally sheets that help SCH 1) convey the true power of collective action 2) understand where the rubbish is coming from for source reduction education and 3) help initiate legislation that reduces pollution.

Microplastics, cigarette buttes and Styrofoam remain at the top of the list, according to Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii, which says "refusing Styrofoam, making sure butts are properly disposed of, and avoiding purchasing plastic can make a huge difference in the health and safety of our oceans."

The data is also reported to NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration).

International Coastal Cleanup Day

By
September 7th, 2012



ocean2

Take part in the largest Kailua Beach cleanup in history (including Kailua, Lanikai, Flat Island and the Mokes) as part of International Coastal Cleanup Day on Saturday, Sept. 15.

Put it on your calendar: International Coastal Cleaup Day is Saturday, Sept. 15.

Here are three beach cleanups you can participate in:

>> Kailua Beach Park Cleanup: Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii is organizing what it calls "the largest beach cleanup event in Kailua history." The cleanup covers all of Kailua Beach, Lanikai Beach as well as Popoia and Mokunui Islands. Meet up at 9:30 a.m. Bags, gloves, tally sheets will be provided. Cleanup ends at noon and volunteers are invited to Lanikai Park for an afternoon of live music, "green" guest speakers, keiki games, eco-education, some food and more. Visit SustainableCoastlinesHawaii.org.

Coldwell Banker Pacific Properties Agents for Change. Courtesy photo.

Agents for Change. Courtesy photo.

>> Sand Island Beach Park Cleanup: The Surfrider Foundation's Oahu Chapter and Coldwell Banker Pacific Properties Agents for Change will team up for a community beach cleanup at Sand Island as part of International Coastal Cleanup Day.

The cleanup takes place from 10 a.m. to noon at Sand Island Beach Park (end of Sand Island Access Road).

Prizes courtesy of Coldwell Banker Pacific Properties Agents for Change include eco-friendly backpacks, reusable bags and water bottles plus a plate lunch for all participants. Coldwell  Banker Pacific Properties Agents for Change is also donating a $2,500 check to the Surfrider Foundation.

>> Kaena Point: The Friends of Kaena also invite volunteers to join a beach cleanup of this beautiful coastline on the Mokuleia side of the North Shore  (and home to nesting Laysan albatross) from 8 to 11:30 a.m. on Saturday. Please bring a reusable water bottle, sunscreen, hat, work gloves and close-toed shoes. Carpooling is encouraged. RSVP here. Call 586-0915 or email info@friendsofkaena.org for more information.

Posted in Green events, Ocean, Volunteer | Comments Off on International Coastal Cleanup Day

Green weekends: Aloha Aina, whale count, Earth Hour

By
March 23rd, 2012



Volunteers help county humbpack whales at "Shark's Cove" on Oahu's North Shore. Photo by Jeremy Mitchell/Courtesy of NOAA's National Marine Sanctuaries

Volunteers help count Hawaiian humbpack whales at "Shark's Cove" on Oahu's North Shore. Photo by Jeremy Mitchell/Courtesy of NOAA's National Marine Sanctuaries.

St. Patrick's Day may be over, but there are plenty of "green" things to do over the next few weekends. Here's a roundup:

9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, March 24: Aloha Aina Earth Day Recycling Community Cleanup. Do some spring cleaning and haul your recyclables to Moanalua Middle School and Moanalua Elementary School for an Aloha Aina Earth Day recycling/ yard sale event.

The following items will be accepted free of charge: scrap metal, HI-5 beverage containers, used cooking oil, computers, printers, scanners, monitors, cell phones, newspaper, cardboard, phonebooks, magazines, all types of batteries, TVs (one per car), used eyeglasses and hearing aids, sneakers, DVDs, CDs, plastic playground sets,  and reusable clothing and household items. Contact Erin Kealoha Fale at 586-9470 (office) or 277-9445 (on-site) for more information.

8 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. on Saturday, March 31: Count the whales. Spaces still remain for volunteers to help in the final count of humpback whales around the Hawaiian islands. Volunteers will count the number of humpback whales seen around the islands over a four-hour period and record their behavior. To register, go to sanctuaryoceancount.org. To find out more, go to hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov.

9 a.m. to noon, on Saturday, March 31: Beach cleanup at Kewalo Basin, Oceandig. This beach cleanup, organized by Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii, promises to be rewarding with a potluck-style BBQ and raffles, games and prizes. Join Oceandig, the After Party later at 6 p.m. at Fresh Cafe in Kakaako to discuss ocean sustainability, watch "Bag It" and listen to live music from local reggae artist Mike Love of Dubkonscious and former American Idol contestant Paula Fuga (who's collaborated with Jack Johnson).

8:30 p.m. Saturday, March 31: Earth Hour. The Fairmont Kea Lani on Maui is planning to participate in Earth Hour 2012, a global environmental awareness event organized by the World Wildlife Fund. At 8:30 p.m. Hawaii time, all 60 of the Fairmont's world-class hotels and resorts will go dark to draw attention to climate change. The Fairmont Kea Lani on Maui will switch off non-essential lighting and encourage guests to turn on flashlights located in each guest room and from their lanai. The hotel will also illuminate its main entrance with more than 200 floating candles in the lobby fountain along with live, unplugged entertainment in Luana Lounge. To participate in Earth Hour, turn off your lights for an hour starting at 8:30 p.m.

Recent Posts

Recent Comments

Archives