Archive for the ‘beach cleanup’ Category

Sand sifter challenge winners

By
November 20th, 2014



Winners

Kailua Sailboards and Kayaks took first place in Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii and Rise's first Ultimate Sand Sifter contest last Saturday. Photos by Nina Wu.

It was a beautiful, sunny morning at Kalama Beach Park in Kailua.

Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii, along with RISE, a core program of KUPU, organized the First Annual Ultimate Sand Sifter Challenge, and invited 20 finalists out of dozens of submissions to demonstrate their models on Saturday, Nov. 15.

The winner was a two-level screen sifter designed by Kailua Sailboards and Kayaks that offered an educational message while separating out microplastics from the sand. Second place went to photographer Ken G. Kosada and third place to surfer and beach cleanup volunteer Harrison Piho. Kailua Sailboards and Kayaks plans to use the $2,500 cash prize (presented by solar company Revolusun) to enhance their educational facility and fund their island restoration projects. And, they decided to give $300 to Kosada and $200 to Piho.

As for the winner, they get another $2,500 to replicate several of their sand sifters for use by volunteer organizations.

There was creativity, ingenuity and enthusiasm, but most of all, there was one goal in common — to figure out how to get these microplastics, pieces of plastics broken down by ultraviolet rays, out of the sand and out of the ocean.

Kailua, a five-mile stretch of fine, white sand, is often named as one of the most beautiful beaches in the world. It's the one that President Barack Obama once jogged on in his bare feet (before he was elected president). And yet, look closely near the high tide waterline, and you will see microplastic debris in that fine, white sand.

Saturday's event was an all-family affair, with plenty of enthusiastic students. Several teams from Punahou School (aspiring engineers from 7th to 10th grade), as well as a team of fifth and sixth-graders from Ho‘ala School in Wahiawa and a student from Kamakau Charter School who created a sand sifter for extra credit, were out demonstrating with their designs.

Ho‘ala School science, math and service teacher Maggie Pulver was able to teach several lessons at once while her students — Ian Shelton, Storey Welch and Christian Ward — designed and put their sand sifter to the test.

Ken Kosada, 2nd place winner, Ultimate Sand Shifter contest, created a spinning device out of recycled items.

Ken Kosada, 2nd place winner, Ultimate Sand Sifter contest, created a spinning device out of recycled items.

The designs were as simple as reused tubes, bucket and jars to more elaborate, spinning bins made from recycled bicycle rims and refurbished wood pallets. They had to be human-powered, without the use of fossil fuels, and designed and built for no more than $300.

Second-place winner Ken Kosada is already tweaking his design in preparation for the 10th annual Da Hui North Shore Clean-Up this Saturday (Nov. 22) at Turtle Bay Resort.

Piho, a regular beach cleanup volunteer and avid surfer from Wahiawa, had one of my favorite designs — a double baby stroller frame plus shoe rack that he found on the sidewalk left out for bulky curbside pickup. He said his design was mobile, and that you could push it across the beach, sifting debris out of the sand. He used simple twist-ties to assemble his sand sifter together.

Strollersandshifter

 

Third-place finalist Harrison Piho with his mobile, repurposed double stroller sandshifter design.

Third-place finalist Harrison Piho with his mobile, repurposed double stroller sand sifter design.

 

Sandy Beach cleanup Saturday

By
July 13th, 2014



Volunteers use a makeshift sand sifter to sift out microplastics at Sandy's Beach. The next beach cleanup is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday, July 19. Photo courtesy RevoluSun.

Volunteers use a makeshift sand sifter to sift out microplastics at Sandys. The next beach cleanup is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday, July 19. Photo courtesy RevoluSun.

RevoluSun once again invites the public to participate in what's become an annual tradition since opening its doors for business in 2009 — a beach cleanup at Sandys on Saturday, July 19. At that first cleanup in 2009, volunteers removed 900 pounds of trash from the Sandy Beach Park shoreline.

The solar company is partnering with the Surfrider Foundation's Oahu Chapter for the fifth cleanup, which takes place from 10 a.m. to noon. on Saturday. RevoluSun is offering volunteers a commemorative T-shirt and free lunch.

The mobile sand-sifter developed by local contractor Jason Tucker Hills, which is designed to separate out micro-plastics, will be back again. Last year, volunteers collected more than 400 pounds of small debris at Sandys. The tally also included more than 2,000 cigarette butts, almost 600 bottle caps and more than 300 drink cans and bottles and single-use food containers — all within 90 minutes. .

Posted in beach cleanup, marine debris | Comments Off on Sandy Beach cleanup Saturday

Sand Sifter Challenge

By
July 3rd, 2014



SandSifterChallenge

Got creative design and build talents?

Then get ready for the first Ultimate Sand Sifter Challenge by Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii and Kupu. Both organizations are challenging contestants to design the ultimate sand sifter to remove microplastics from Hawaii's beaches. Microplastics, tiny pieces of broken-down plastic that wash ashore from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, are a hazard to marine animals that consume them.

If you've ever visited any windward Oahu beach, look down and what you may think are colorful shells are actually tiny pieces of plastic.

Deadline for online submissions is due Sept. 26.

Register with your name, affiliation, email, a phone number and then, simply, a drawing and description of your sifter design. The sifter must be human-powered (using no gas or fossil fuels) and should be designed and constructed for under $300, with an emphasis on reused, recycled and sustainable materials.

"Marine debris is going to continue washing ashore until we as global citizens drastically reduce our use of unnecessary plastics," said executive director Kahi Pacarro. "Until that time, in order for our beaches to remain the nicest in the world,  the public will need to #cleanyobeach! Sand sifters make our work easier and will promote newer ideas to make our work more efficient and educational."

Last summer, RevoluSun donated a sandsifter for a beach cleanup at Sandy's Beach. Check out their design.

Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii will announce the designs that have been green lighted Oct. 3. Participating individuals then have until Nov. 14 to build their sand sifters. The final competition will be held Nov. 15 at Kailua Beach Park. Winner gets $2,500 plus an additional $2,500 to build their sand sifter for partner organizations that clean Oahu's coastlines.

Can you design and build a sand sifter to separate out microplastics? Photo courtesy Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii.

Can you design and build a sand sifter to separate out microplastics? Photo courtesy Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii.

Posted in beach cleanup, marine debris, Ocean, Plastic | Comments Off on Sand Sifter Challenge

Beach cleanup: International Surfing Day

By
June 18th, 2014



International Surf Day 2014. Free computer desktop wall paper. Courtesy image.

International Surf Day 2014. Free computer desktop wall paper. Courtesy image.

If you surf, or appreciate surfing and all the ocean has to offer, then put  beach cleanup day on your calendar the morning of Saturday, June 21, at Point Panic in Kakaako in celebration of International Surfing Day.

Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii, in partnership with the Kokua Hawaii Foundation, Malama Point Panic, Surfrider Foundation Oahu Chapter and BAMP Project host the annual South Shore cleanup Saturday. The public is invited to meet at 9:30 a.m. at Point Panic, Kakaako Park.

Surfrider Foundation will also be hosting beach cleanups in partnership with First Hawaiian Bank from 9:30  to 11:30 a.m. at Kaimana (Sans Souci), Queen's Surf, Kahala and Diamond Head beach parks. Volunteers, including more than 250 First Hawaiian Bank Community Care volunteers will be sifting sand for microplastic and extracting trash and debris.

Surfrider volunteers should check in at 9 a.m. at Diamond Head Beach Park; First Hawaiian Bank volunteers at Kapiolani Park. Lunch, prizes and entertainment will follow from noon to 1 p.m. at Kapiolani Park. Look for yellow banners. Check out Surfrider's My Special Place contest on Instagram.

In Kakaako, crew members from the three non-profit organizations will guide volunteers in cleaning the coastline at designated zones and surrounding areas. Following the cleanup at noon, participants are invited to attend an after-cleanup pa‘ina with live music by Paul Izak at Point Panic.

Hula Grill os offering plastic-free, zero-waste lunches while supplies last. Volunteers will have the opportunity to win several prizes provided by the BAMP Project and others, including tickets to the upcoming Jack Johnson concert.

Educational booths will also be set up to feature topics related to ocean health, marine debris and single-use plastics.

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Ocean trash: a people problem

By
May 21st, 2014



top-10-items

The tally from the Ocean Conservancy's International Coastal Cleanup is in, and no surprise that cigarette butts still top the list of the Top 10 items collected. Candy wrappers came in second, followed by plastic beverage bottles and plastic bottle caps.

Volunteers across the globe picked up more than 12 million pounds of trash during the 2013 International Coastal Cleanup in September , the most ever collected in the event's history, according to a report released today (May 21, 2014). The new total, according to the Ocean Conservancy, is an indicator of the tremendous amount of ocean trash found on shorelines, in the ocean and waterways around the globe.

The Conservancy, while celebrating the volunteer effort, is also using this occasion to make a worldwide appeal to find solutions to stopping the trash that ends up in the ocean at its many sources.

"Ocean trash truly is a global problem that affects human health and safety, endangers marine wildlife, and costs states and nations countless millions in wasted resources and lost revenue," said Andreas Merkl, Ocean Conservancy's president and CEO. "At its core, however, ocean trash is not an ocean problem; it is a people problem — perpetuated by the often unwitting practices that industry and people have adopted over time. But I am convinced we can solve it if we have the audacity to confront the problem head-on."

The full trash index is available online.

To put it in another perspective:

>> Trash collected by volunteers would fill roughly 38 Olympic size swimming pools, or weigh about the same as 823 male African elephants.

>> The amount of fishing line collected would go up and over Mt. Everest five times.

>> The number of bottle caps found would carpet three football fields, laid side by side.

>> There were enough items found to furnish an entire studio apartment, including an air conditioner, sink, fridge, stove,  microwave, washing machine, couch, tables and chairs, TV set, coffee table, rug, curtains and mattresses!

>> There were also most of the items needed for a wedding, as well as items necessary for caring for a baby. More unusual items included a plastic eyeball, 1904 typewriter, blonde wig and trampoline.

What you can do? Here are 10 Things You Can Do to help keep the seas trash-free:

10-things-you-can-do

Posted in beach cleanup, marine debris, Ocean | Comments Off on Ocean trash: a people problem

Earth Day 2014

By
April 13th, 2014



www.outlook.noaa.gov/earthday/

www.outlook.noaa.gov/earthday/

Earth Day is Tuesday, April 22, 2014.

Each year, Earth Day marks the anniversary of what many consider the birth of the modern environmental movement in 1970.

While 1970 was the "height of the hippie and flower-child culture in the United States," according to the Earth Day Network, 2014 is an era of social media, solar power and genetically modified organisms.

Global warming, or climate change, was, and is, still an issue.

Do a google search for "Earth day 1970" and  you find black-and-white images of demonstrations, rallies and a nationwide Environmental Teach-In over clean water and air. I like the ones portrayed in this  National Geographic story on the first Earth Day. It was definitely not a time of apathy.

Today, many start celebrating Earth Day early, with events scheduled throughout Earth Month. There are plenty of ways to learn more or get involved on Oahu, whether you want to start a worm compost, participate in a beach cleanup or recycle your electronics.

The University of Hawaii at Manoa hosts an all-day festival at its symbolic Sustainability Courtyard. Former U.S. vice president Al Gore delivers a free lecture at the Stan Sheriff Center on Tuesday, April 15, while environmental activist Bill McKibben speaks at the Art Auditorium April 24.

Check out one of the events below.

EARTH DAY EVENTS IN APRIL

April 13

Worm composting workshop. April 13, 6:30 p.m. and April 15, 9 a.m., Nuuanu Congregational Church, 2651 Pali Highway, Kosasa Hall. The church’s Ula Wai ministry offers two free community sessions on vermicomposting by Ralph Rhoads of Bellingham, Wash. Reservations required by emailing Velma, kimoment2@hawaiiantel.net or calling 595-3135 after 7 p.m..

April 15

Al Gore lecture, 7 p.m. (doors open at 5 p.m.), Tuesday, April 15. Stan Sherriff Center, University of Hawaii at Manoa. Former U.S. vice president Al Gore offers a free lecture on campus, sharing his insights on climate change and related topics and how they relate to Hawaii. Organized by the UH Sea Grant College Program of the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, joinly with the office of U.S. Senator Brian Schatz. Free, but tickets are required and can be picked up from the Stan Sherriff Center Ticket office, 956-4483.

April 16 

Mala Ho‘olaule‘a, 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Honolulu Community College, 874 Dillingham Blvd., behind the Children’s Center. Celebrate the harvest of The Garden of Niuhelewai, a taro patch, planted three years ago on campus. Hawaiian music, poi pounding. Call 845-9211.

April 19

Earth Day Ahupua‘a Cleanup, 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, April 19. Kualoa Ranch. Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii is organizing a beach cleanup of several coastlines to celebrate Earth Day. Participants can also help rebuild fish ponds, do stream restoration work or native plantings. Check in at Kualoa Ranch at 8:30 a.m. to participate in cleanups at Kualoa Beach, Kalama Beach Park, Kahuku Beach and Laie Beach Park. You may also go directly to the beach location. Festival with lunch and live music follows at Kualoa Ranch from noon to 3 p.m. Partners include Hui o Ko‘olaupoko, Paepae o He‘eia and Papahana Kualoa. Visit www.fb.com/sustainablecoastlineshawaii for updates.

EarthDayCleanup

April 19 

Mauka to Makai Environmental Expo, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Waikiki Aquarium. Honolulu's Department of Environmental Services and state Department of Health Clean Water Branch present the seventh annual Mauka to Makai Environmental Expo. Visit educational booths, learn about the impact we make on water sources from Mauka to Makai, watch a live rain garden demonstration and take pictures with Apoha the oopu and friends. Free admission, prizes and native plant giveaways by the Hawaiian Electric Co. Free parking and shuttle from Waikiki Elementary School. Call 923-9741 or visit www.waikikiaquarium.org.

April 19

Kaka‘ako Community Cleanup, 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. The Shidler Group, Team Hawaii Going Green, Kaka‘ako Improvement Association and others are organizing the third annual Kaka‘ako Community Cleanup. Free validated parking at Waterfront Plaza, 500 Ala Moana Blvd. (entrance on Pohukaina St.). Cleaning, painting supplies and refreshments provided. Starts at Mother Waldron Park, ends at Waterfront Plaza. RSVP to Steve Sullivan, ssullivan@shidler.com or 532-4751. Visit www.fb.com/events/648168028565920 for event details.

April 22

Earth Day

10 a.m. to noon, Hawaii State Capitol. Community clean energy rally sponsored by the Blue Planet Foundation. Join Hawaii's youth as they rally a future beyond fossil fuels. Visit  www.fb.com/blueplanetfoundation for details and updates.

April 24

UH MANOA EARTH DAY FESTIVAL & CONCERT 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. April 24, Sustainability Courtyard, University of Hawaii at Manoa. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Earth Day Festival: Visit more than 40 booths from student groups, local non-profits and green businesses. Plant sale, music, poetry, locally sourced food. 4 to 6 p.m. Celebratory reception. 6 to 7:30 p.m. Environmental activist Bill McKibben’s free lecture at the Art Auditorium. 7:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. Free concert by Mike Love, Sam Ites, Lucie Lynch and slam poet Jenna Robinson. Visit manoa.hawaii.edu/earthday or www.fb.com/uhmearthday.

earthday-v5

April 26

Eat Your Yard! Edible Landscaping Workshop. 10 to 12:30 p.m.. The Green House, 224 Pakohana St. Organic gardener and permaculturist Tia Silvasy will lead this class focusing on growing food instead of grass. Explore the types of plants brought to Hawaii by many ethnic groups such as cassava, banana, taro, sweet potato, lemongrass, sugarcane and coconut. Cuttings and starts will also be shared. Fee is $30. Advanced registration required. Call 524-8427 or visit www.thegreenhousehawaii.com.

April 26

Green Day eWaste Recycling, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nu‘uanu Congregational Church, 2651 Pali Highway. Pacific Corporate Solutions is accepting desktop and laptop computers, LCD monitors, printers, fax machines, keyboards, mice, servers, routers, DVD players, VCRs, cell phones, stereo equipment, video cameras, cables and more for recycling. No TVs or alkaline batteries. Free. Call 488-8870 for more information.

Malama Pupukea-Waimea Marine Science Talk Story, 5-7 p.m., Sunset Beach Recreation Center, 59-540 Kamehameha Highway. Learn the current science about Pupukea-Waimea Marine Life Conservation District. Light pupus and refreshments will be provided. Contact Jenny Yagodich, jenny@pupukeawaimea.org or visit www.pupukeawaimea.org for more inforamtion.

Posted in beach cleanup, Composting, Earth Day | Comments Off on Earth Day 2014

Saving Waikiki

By
February 12th, 2014



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Volunteers are welcome to help remove three types of invasive algae from the reef behind Waikiki aquarium during public beach cleanups scheduled from February through October.

The Waikiki Aquarium recently received a $43,951 Community Restoration Partnership grant to continue its Waikiki Coastal Restoration efforts and research. The alien algae — Acanthophora spicifera, Gracilaria salicornia and Avrainvillea amadelpha — choke the reefs and crowd out native limu. They're considered a marine menace and threat to the beauty of Waikiki.

Beach cleanups will be held from 9 to 11 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 15, as well as on Saturdays, March 29, May 3, June 28 and Oct. 25.

"This grant allows us to further engage the public in our conservation efforts, which is a very important goal for us in 2014," said Aquarium director Andrew Rossiter. "We encourage everyone who has an interest in the ocean to join us for a rewarding Saturday morning out on the reef."

Volunteers will first  be trained on how to differentiate between invasive and native algae plants followed by hands-on removal experience on the reef using snorkels, paddleboards and buckets. Dr. Celia Smith and her team from the University of Hawaii Botany Department will provide the training. Starbucks and Diamond Bakery are providing coffee and snacks for volunteers.

Waikiki Aquarium's volunteers have removed thousands of pounds of invasive algae from the reef behind the aquarium over the decade in an effort to protect the native marine plants.

Other organizations, including Malama Maunalua, have also worked hard to remove invasive algae from Maunalua Bay (which stretches from Diamond Head to Koko Head) in East Oahu, with hopeful signs that the bay is being restored. Malama Maunalua also offers volunteer opportunities. On the windward side, a Super Sucker, a mobile underwater pump-vacuum, is used to remove invasive algae from Kaneohe Bay.

To voluteer for the Waikiki Coastal Restoration program, call the aquarium's volunteer office at 440-9020 or visit www.waikikiaquarium.org.

Posted in beach cleanup, Conservation, invasive species, Marine Life, Volunteer | Comments Off on Saving Waikiki

MLK Beach Cleanups

By
January 17th, 2014



 PlasticFreeHawaii

Here's your opportunity to help the environment at the start of the year 2014.

There are beach cleanups planned by Plastic Free Hawai‘i  and its community partners at three sites around Oahu on Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service Monday (Jan. 20). Volunteers check in at 8:30 a.m. and clean up between 9 and 11 a.m.

Bring a reusable water bottle, hat and sunscreen.

Choose one of the three:

>> Ka‘ena Point. Volunteers will clean along the Mokule‘ia Route.

>> Malaekahana Beach Park. Meet at mile market 34.

>> Waimanalo Beach Park.

For more info, email plasticfree@kokuahawaiifoundation.org.

 

Posted in beach cleanup, Volunteer | Comments Off on MLK Beach Cleanups

Da Hui North Shore Beach Cleanup Nov. 9

By
November 7th, 2013



DaHuiFlyer

It's time again for the annual Da Hui North Shore Beach Cleanup on Saturday, Nov. 9.

Join Da Hui, Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii, Kokua Hawaii Foundation, The Eddie Aikau Foundation and Surfrider Foundation as they clean more than 15 miles of beaches stretching from Haleiwa Beach Park to Kahuku.

Check in time is 8 a.m. at Turtle Bay Resort (West Lawn, by the stables). Look for the educational booth (coffee will be provided.)

Teams leave for their clean-up zones at 8:30 a.m. and participate until 10:30 a.m., then return to the resort for a free BBQ and live music at 11 a.m., followed by a pro-surf autograph session. The musical lineup is a surprise.

Participants are also encouraged to bring one non-perishable food item to be donated to Hawaii Foodbank. The first 200 participants to bring donations will receive a free Da Hui sticker.

Email Mahina Chillingworth at mahina@dahui.com for more information or message her on Facebook.

This is an alcohol- and drug-free event.

Posted in beach cleanup | Comments Off on Da Hui North Shore Beach Cleanup Nov. 9

Mokuleia Beach Cleanup

By
October 11th, 2013



Surfrider Foundation partners with the Hawaii Polo Club for a beach cleanup at Mokuleia this Saturday. Photos from soest.hawaii.edu.

Surfrider Foundation partners with the Hawaii Polo Club for a beach cleanup at Mokuleia this Sunday. Photos from soest.hawaii.edu.

The Surfrider Foundation, Oahu Chapter, hosts its next beach cleanup at Mokuleia on Sunday (Oct. 13). The first 100 volunteers will get free entry into the polo match at Hawaii Polo Club plus a free lunch.

October is also Rise Above Plastics month, a campaign to raise awareness on plastic pollution in the ocean. Our ocean is turning into a plastic soup, with most of it starting as land-based litter on beaches, streets and dsidewalks. Rain washes the litter through the storm drain system, into rivers, streams and eventually, the ocean.

Surfrider Foundation.

Surfrider Foundation.

When plastics enter the marine environment, they don't biodegrade. Instead, they photodegrade into small pieces that fish and turtles mistake for food, oftentimes blocking digestion systems and causing death. Next time you go to a windward-side beach, look closely at the high tide water mark. You'll find little, itty-bitty pieces of colorful plastic in the sand.

You can make a difference, with simple, everyday actions to reduce plastic — particularly single-use plastics. Bring your own bag to the grocery store AND the retail store. Bring your own reusable cup to the coffee shop. Choose alternatives to plastic, like stainless steel or glass.

The beach cleanup takes place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Meet at the Hawaii Polo Club, Mokuleia, 68-411 Farrington Highway. The Hawaii Polo Club and John Hopkins University alumni group are offering free entrance to the polo matches with lunch to the first 100 volunteers.

Posted in beach cleanup, Green events, Ocean | Comments Off on Mokuleia Beach Cleanup

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