Author Archive

Reinventing the wheel

By
July 12th, 2016



The Ala Wai Canal in Waikiki has for years been the collection point for plastic debris and litter, which in turn flows into the ocean, not to mention the site of the worst massive sewage discharge of 48-million gallons of untreated wastewater in 2006.

Now, three non-profit groups — Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii, 808 Cleanups and the Surfrider Foundation — are hoping to bring the Trash Water Wheel to Honolulu's Ala Wai Canal. The solar-powered wheel, which a Baltimore, Md. non-profit brought to its Inner Harbor two years ago, has reportedly removed more than 350 tons of litter there.

Baltimore water wheel powered by solar panels and currents. Courtesy Sierraclub.org.

Baltimore water wheel powered by solar panels and currents. Courtesy Sierraclub.org.

It kind of looks like a covered wagon with a spinning wheel and array of solar panels on top. The Waterfront Partnership of Baltimore says it is capable of picking up 50,000 pounds of trash per day using a combination of old and new technology. Two booms direct trash and debris toward the front of the water wheel, which moves it up a conveyer belt (powered by the water wheel and solar panels) and into a dumpster.

Hawaii's three non-profits recently launched an indiegogo campaign seeking to raise $6,500 to conduct a feasibility study (plus offer donors various perks). The goal has been surpassed in less than 10 days.

Kahi Pacarro, director of Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii, says he has met with state and city officials, who agreed the project should be a priority for Oahu but requires a feasibility study first. All funds beyond the goal will go towards the actual water wheel. If the feasibility study ends up determining that the water wheel is not feasible for Honolulu, the funds will be split between the three non-profits for perpetuating their missions of cleaning Hawaii's coastlines.

The indiegogo campaign runs until Aug. 19.

Free energy kits

By
July 6th, 2016



connector

The Blue Planet Foundation, in partnership with Bidgely, an Energy Excelerator portfolio company and Hawaiian Electric, is offering free home energy monitoring kits to 750 homes across Oahu.

The software kit allows participants to measure how much energy their homes and specific appliances – like the refrigerator or water heater – are using at a given time via an app.

It will also include tips and fun energy challenges that participants complete for the chance to win prizes.

The pilot program's goal is to equip households and businesses with the tools they need to take control of their energy choices, and shift power consumption patterns to better match renewable energy supply as well as reduce peak energy demand.

"We're making the invisible, visible," said David Aquino, Blue Planet's director of innovation. "Many residents get a $200 energy bill at the end of the month and have no idea how, when, or where that energy was used."

Blue Planet will schedule and provide free installation of the energy kits which will involve hooking up a device to the circuit breaker box (should take no more than 30 minutes). The Bidgely HomeBeat app will display in-home energy consumption and the breakdown of energy use by each appliance, via a smartphone or online, with real-time alerts.

Bidgely has launched similar programs in other parts of the U.S., including in 2014 with Pacific Gas & Electric in northern California, which found that monitoring appliances yielded up to 7.7 percent in energy savings among about 850 participants.

Results from the Oahu pilot program should be released at the end of the year.

Visit blueplanetfoundation.org/powerchallenge to schedule an installation.

Posted in Blue Planet Foundation, Energy | Comments Off on Free energy kits

808 Cleanups Volunteers

By
July 1st, 2016



MarcusGriego

You've got to hand it to them.

Volunteers for 808 Cleanups are out there, spending their time, efforts and energy on cleaning up on any given day of the week — from Nanakuli to Hawaii Kai. From the depths of the ocean to the summit of Koko Crater . For them, Earth Day really is every day and instead of complaining, they're actually TAKING ACTION.

Recently, 808 Cleanups co-founder Michael D. Loftin has been posting what motivates these volunteers to do what they do. Maybe they will inspire you.

"It's my pleasure to share what you've told me in your own words," he wrote on Facebook. "Why you are a member of 808 Cleanups. It is my honor and privilege to know you and work with you on cleanups."

Below are just a few of the volunteers out of hundreds, from all walks of life, who share what motivates them. Find these posts at fb.com/808cleanups. Inspired? Here are 10 ways to get started.

NalaniU‘i Tector, Nanakuli

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Uncle George, Pokai Bay

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Jay Lee, Honolulu (Old Stadium Park)

JayLee

Joanna Fletchall, Kailua Beach Park

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Mary Eileen, Waimanalo

MaryEileen

Brian Connors, Koko Crater

BrianConnors

Posted in beach cleanup, Green non-profits, Lifestyle, marine debris, Volunteer | Comments Off on 808 Cleanups Volunteers

Kupu out in force

By
June 23rd, 2016



These youth from Kupu Hawaii will be out in full force doing conservation work this summer as part of the Hawaii Youth Conservation Corps program. Photos courtesy Kupu Hawaii/Samuel Apuna.

These youth from Kupu Hawaii will be out in full force doing conservation work this summer as part of the Hawaii Youth Conservation Corps program. Photos courtesy Kupu Hawaii/Samuel Apuna.

This summer, several hundred students from Kupu Hawaii, a non-profit based in Kakaako, will be out in full force, doing conservation work throughout the Hawaiian isles.

They'll be participating in paid internships as part of the Hawaii Youth Conservation Corps that give them hands-on experience restoring fishponds and wetlands, removing invasive species from natural area reserves and helping to protect seabirds on Maui. Read some of their stories right here.

John Leong, executive director of Kupu Hawaii, said: "It's inspiring their potential toward green jobs and conservation opportunities in life, but also empowering them as people. To get a sense of kuleana for our state, for our communities."

Kupu Hawaii's Environmental Fair. Courtesy Kupu Hawaii/ Samuel Apuna.

Kupu Hawaii's Environmental Fair. Courtesy Kupu Hawaii/ Samuel Apuna.

Kupu Hawaii recently invited emerging environmental leaders to its 7th Annual Environmental Fair in early June at their Kewalo Training Facility in Kakaako.

Among the 150 partner organizations on hand at the fair were the Department of Land and Natural Resources, Lyon Arboretum, Hawai‘i Conservation Alliance, Oahu Invasive Species Committee and Hui o Ko‘olaupoko to speak with the prospective interns.

Three Kupu alumni — Molly Mamaril, Jayleen Marar and Ronnie "Keoni" Kikila shared stories of how internships lead them to real-life conservation jobs. The sound system was operated by Pedal Power Hawaii.

Nicole Fisher and Molly Mamaril, speaker, at Kupu Hawaii's Environmental Fair. Photo courtesy Kupu Hawaii/Samuel Apuna.

Nicole Fisher and Molly Mamaril, speaker, at Kupu Hawaii's Environmental Fair. Photo courtesy Kupu Hawaii/Samuel Apuna.

>Molly Mamaril, a Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fellow with Kupu's RISE program in 2014, went on to work for the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument. With a bachelor's degree in journalism and master's in natural resources and environmental management, she writes for Green magazine and coordinates Hawaii Investment Ready.

> Jayleen Marar, a recent Farrington High School graduate who joined Kupu as a program member to get on-the-job training. Marr received the "MOst Outstanding Intern" award and worked with Opterra Energy Services, conducting energy audits at schools for the state Department of Education'sKa Hei program.

>> Ronnie "Keoni" Kikala, once a troubled teen, completed his Kupu internship with the Lyon Arboretum's Pahole Rare Plant Facility. He continues to work part-time at Lyon while pursuing a degree from Windward Community College. He has since found his calling and passion in life for conserving rare and native plants.

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Environmental Fair speakers and Kupu alumni, Ronnie Kikala, left and Jayleen Marar, right. Photos courtesy Kupu Hawaii/Samuel Apuna.

Kupu Hawaii's mission is "to empower youth to serve their communities through character-building, service-learning and environmental stewardship opportunities that encourage integrity with God (Ke Akua), self and others."

Paid internships as a Kupu Environmental Leader in Conservation, Environmental Education and Community Development are available, with benefits that include a monthly allowance of $1,300 or more, plus a $5,765 education award. Visit Kupu Hawaii's Facebook page to learn more.

Kupu Hawaii interns learning about the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology. Photos courtesy Kupu Hawaii/Samuel Apuna.

Kupu Hawaii's summer interns learning about the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology. Photos courtesy Kupu Hawaii/Samuel Apuna.

Posted in Conservation, Green events, Green jobs, Green non-profits | Comments Off on Kupu out in force

Off the hook

By
June 14th, 2016



Hawaiian monk seal RK90 with a hook lodged in its mouth. NOAA's rescue team was able to remove the hook and save her in 2013. Photo courtesy NOAA Fisheries.

Hawaiian monk seal RK90 with a hook lodged in its mouth. NOAA's rescue team was able to remove the hook and save her in 2013. Photo courtesy NOAA Fisheries.

There's a simple way that fishermen and fisherwomen in Hawaii can help the Hawaiian monk seals and other marine mammals — by converting to a barbless circle hook.

At the 13th annual Tokunaga Ulua Challenge Fishing Tournament weigh-in on Sunday, every fish caught with a barbless circle hook was given a special sticker, according to a news release from the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources.

Kurt Kawamoto, aka Mr. Barbless Hook, is the driving force behind the NOAA and DLNR Barbless Circle Hook Project. The program encourages the fishing community to opt for barbless hooks to reduce potential injury to marine mammals like Hawaiian monk seals in the event of an accidental hooking or entanglement. It also allows for a quicker release, but is still capable of catching ulua and other tournament-worthy fish weighing in at 100 pounds or more.

"We caught over 300 shoreline fish, of many different kinds," said Kawamoto, a fisherman himself. "We looked at the catches, losses and misses and statistically we couldn't tell the difference. Essentially you could catch just as many fish with a barbless circle hook."

It's pretty simple. To make a barbless circle hook, use a crimper or parallel-jawed pliers to flatten the barb.

Barbed hook, left, becomes a barbless circle hook. right. Courtesy NOAA Fisheries.

Barbed hook, left, becomes a barbless circle hook. right. Courtesy NOAA Fisheries.

"Once you smash down the barbs on these hooks they become self-shedding, so that was the main idea behind it," said Kawamoto in the press release. "It's easy for a fish, or a seal or a turtle to get rid of the hook themselves."

Researchers have witnessed a monk seal actually shed a barbless circle hook and anglers have relayed stories about sea turtles doing the same.

The Hawaiian Monk Seal Research Program team recently extricated a barbed, circle hook from the throat of a juvenile female seal from Kauai over Kamehameha Day weekend.

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If the Tokunaga fishing competition was any indication, barbless circle hooks are still capable of getting a pretty good catch. An estimated 50 percent of the 637 contestants this year catch their fish using barbless circle hooks. Last year, the winning ulua was caught with a barbless hook. This year, the winning omilu was caught by a woman using a barbless hook.

Related video:

Posted in Marine Life | Comments Off on Off the hook

#oceanfriendlyhi restaurants

By
June 8th, 2016



The Medi Bowl - Kalo falafel, fire-roasted baba ganoush, beet hummus, refreshing millet tabouleh over a bed of greens drizzled with a special herb tahini sauce - is served up in a wood bowl at the Ai Love Nalo Restaurant in Waimanalo. Photo by Bruce Asato.

The Medi Bowl - Kalo falafel, fire-roasted baba ganoush, beet hummus, refreshing millet tabouleh over a bed of greens drizzled with a special herb tahini sauce - is served up in a wood bowl at the ‘Ai Love Nalo Restaurant in Waimanalo. Photo by Bruce Asato.

Restaurants in Hawaii can still offer takeout in polystyrene foam clamshells and plastic bags, but some are opting not to.

On World Oceans Day today (June 8, 2016), certified Ocean Friendly Restaurants, part of a new initiative launched by various non-profit groups, will offer discounts and specials if you feature them with #oceanfriendlyhi.

The Surfrider Foundation, in partnership with the Maui Huliau Foundation and Kokua Hawai‘i Foundation and Rise Above Plastics Coalition, is celebrating the statewide launch of the Ocean Friendly Restaurants program today.

What is a certified Ocean Friendly Restaurant?

It’s a restaurant that has agreed to reduce the amount of disposable plastics it offers to customers and to make sincere efforts to adopt sustainable practices for the health of our oceans.

Smoothies and this poi parfait with fresh fruits, poi and coconut flakes are served up in mason jars at Ai Love Nalo. Photo by Nina Wu.

Smoothies and this poi parfait with fresh fruits, poi and coconut flakes are served up in mason jars at Ai Love Nalo. Photo by Nina Wu.

Restaurants must, for example, agree not to use polystyrene foam for food take-out containers and offer reusable tableware for in-house diners (many offer in-house diners disposables out of convenience) as well as follow proper recycling practices. There is no fee to participate.

They must also follow at least three of the following five practices:

> Offer plastic straws only upon request or replace them with compostable straws;

> Offer all recyclable or compostable take-out beverage containers;

> Provide non-plastic takeout bags only upon request;

> Provide only compostable utensils for take-out upon request;

> Agree not sell beverages in plastic bottles.

“All of us need to have responsibility, whether it’s the producer or the consumer or the government,” said Rafael Bergstrom, Oahu chapter coordinator of the Surfrider Foundation. “The only way we’re going to make change getting single-use products out of our waste stream is if it’s bought into at all levels.”

While consumers are still encouraged to say no to straws, bring their own reusable water bottles and bags, Surfrider wanted to recognize businesses that were “doing the right thing already," even if not legally required to do so.

The new program started with Surfrider’s San Diego chapter and began making its way across the isles in April.

Ocean Friendly Restaurants in Hawaii include about 50 well-known names, including Ai Love Nalo, Downbeat Diner, Chef Chai, The Counter at Kahala Mall, Wahoo’s Fish Taco and Cholo’s in Haleiwa.

On Maui, some popular spots include the Market Fresh Bistro in Makawao, Cafe Des Amis in Paia and Bamboo Fresh in Lahaina and in Hilo, Pineapple's Fresh Island Cuisine and Le Magic Pan.

If restaurants comply with all eight criteria, like the Kona Brewing Co., they’ll be certified as a platinum level Ocean FriendlyRestaurant.

The focus is currently on reducing plastic pollution from getting into the waste stream, and not so much on sourcing food from local farms or sustainable seafood, though many Ocean Friendly Restaurants also adopt those practices. Down the line, Bergstrom said the initiative might recognize these as well.

Participating restaurants get a “We Are an Ocean Friendly Restaurant” decal to display, promotion via the website and Facebook page and rack cards to help educate customers. Volunteers from the non-profit groups are certifying the restaurants. Nominations are accepted online at oceanfriendlyrestaurantshawaii.org.

Follow @oceanfriendlyrestaurants on Instagram for updates.

Posted in Marine Life, Ocean, Plastic, World Oceans Day | Comments Off on #oceanfriendlyhi restaurants

Coastlines full of plastic

By
June 6th, 2016



Most of the marine debris in the Hawaiian isles is made up of plastic, very small pieces of plastic. Courtesy DLNR.

Most of the marine debris in the Hawaiian isles is made up of plastic, very small pieces of plastic. Courtesy DLNR.

It's confirmed. Most of the marine debris landing on Hawaii's shores is made up of — plastics. Very small plastics.

An aerial survey by the Department of Land and Natural Resources and North Pacific Marine Science Organization of all coastlines in the eight main Hawaiian islands shows that plastics constitute most of the marine debris landing on our shores.

The sparsely populated island of Niihau had the highest concentration of debris, at 38 percent, compared to Oahu, which had the lowest, at 5 percent.

A very limited amount of debris was associated with the Japan tsumani, according to DLNR chair Suzanne Case. The study was funded by the Ministry of the Environment of Japan as part of the Japan Tsunami Gift Fund.

Multiple photos were captured every 0.7 seconds from a Cessna 206 about 2,000 feet above ground.

"Most of what was mapped is common, everyday items that someone haphazardly tossed onto the ground or directly into the water," said Case. "These items get caught up in ocean currents and unfortunately much of it eventually lands, mostly on north and east facing shores. Hawaii is recognized around the world for our beautiful beaches. Unfortunately we cannot say they are pristine, because they've been so seriously impacted by our trash."

The following is a synopsis of the full report which used imagery analysis for the aerial survey conducted between August and November 2015.  (from highest to lowest):

Niihau — Identified a total of 7,871 pieces of marine debris. Most of it was plastic (46 percent), followed by buoys and floats (35 percent). The greatest density of debris were found on east-facing shores.

Molokai — Identified a total of 2,878 piece of marine debris, 37 percent plastic, 35 percent buoys and floats. Concentrated on the northwestern shores and a small area on the northeastern corner of the Friendly Isle.

Hawaii — Identified a total of 2,200 pieces of marine debris, 52 percent plastic. Concentrated on the southeastern tip of the island around Kamilo Point.

Kauai — Identified a total of 1,849 pieces of marine debris, 49 percent plastic, concentrated on the eastern shores.

Lanai — Identified a total of 1,829 piece of marine debris, 53 percent plastic, concentrated on the northeast coast.

Maui — Identified a total of 1,749 pieces of marine debris, 40 percent plastic, concentrated on the northern side around Kahului.

Kahoolawe — Identified a total of 1,298 pieces of marine debris, 47 percent plastic, concentrated on the northern tip of the island and the Keoneuli area on the eastern coast.

Oahu — Identified a total of 984 pieces of marine debris, 63 percent plastic, concentrated on the northern tip around Kahuku.

Boat that landed on Hawaii shores from the Japan tsunami. Courtesy DLNR.

Boat that landed on Hawaii shores from the Japan tsunami. Courtesy DLNR.

On March 11, 2011, the Tohoku Earthquake and resulting tsunami devastated Japan, creating millions of tons of debris that got swept into the ocean. The first confirmed tsunami-related debris that landed on Hawaii's shores was a blue plastic, fishing container on Sept. 18, 2012 off Makapuu. Since then, 21 vessels and an assortment of buoys, fishing containers, signs and other items have been recovered in Hawaii.

Plastic debris, Kahuku Beach on Oahu. Courtesy DLNR.

Plastic debris, Kahuku Beach on Oahu. Courtesy DLNR.

Wildlife become entangled in nets and lines, or mistakenly eat pieces of plastic and foam, confusing them for food. The report (p. 41) includes photos of endangered monk seals on Niihau resting on beaches littered with marine debris, including plastic and derelict fishing gear.

Marine debris. Courtesy DLNR.

Marine debris. Courtesy DLNR.

The debris was classified into seven categories, including buoys and floats, foam, derelict fishing gear, plastic, tires, other (includes processed wood, metal, cloth, abandoned boats) and inconclusive. Below, some plastic debris and a tire.

Marine debris, Kahuku, north shore of Oahu. Courtesy DLNR.

Marine debris, Kahuku, north shore of Oahu. Courtesy DLNR.

The most common type of debris found on all islands was plastic, making up 47 percent of the overall composition of debris identified, and at least 37 percent of the debris on any individual island.

On Oahu, Hawaii's most populous island, marine debris was concentrated on the northern tip of the island, on the east-facing shore between the northernmost point and Kahuku area. But a whopping 63 percent was identified as plastic. It's possible that the lower concentration of marine debris on Oahu reflects continuous beach clean-up efforts by local residents and conservation organizations, according to former DLNR Marine Debris Coordinator Kirsten Moy.

Kahuku

So what are the next steps? To use the data to organize and plan cleanup efforts, as well as to develop a community-accessible database to distribute the debris data and track removal efforts throughout the isles.

Related video featuring Kirsten Moy, DLNR's former Marine Debris Coordinator (courtesy DLNR):

Saving ‘ohi‘a lehua

By
May 30th, 2016



ohialehuaDLNR

New signs created by the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources are aimed towards educating hunters, hikers, mountain bikers and others visiting state public lands about Rapid ‘Ohi‘a Death.

Anya Tagawa and Jeff Bagshaw of othe DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife's Natural Area Reserve program are hoping the signs help prevent the spread of the fungal disease, which has decimated tens of thousands of acres of native ‘ohi‘a on the Big Island.

The fungal disease, also known as Ceratocystis Wilt, affects the vascular system of the tree. Once stricken, healthy, mature ‘ohi‘a lehua trees can die within a matter of weeks. The disease has the potential to kill ‘ohi‘a trees, which are the backbone of the native rainforest, statewide.

"It is critical that every person who goes into the woods or forest anywhere in Hawaii, takes steps to prevent this disease from spreading," said DLNR chair Suzanne Case in a press release. "Anya and Jeff's work along with a team of other outreach experts, is vitally important in getting kamaaina and visitors alike to be certain they don't inadvertently track the fungus from place to place."

Bagshaw, his staff and volunteers recently conducted surveys with visitors to the Ahihi-Kinau Natural Area Reserve and found very few people had any knowledge about Rapid ‘Ohi‘a Death.

"We hope hikers and all forest users will start to be conscious wherever they go, even if there's ‘ohi‘a there or not," said Bagshaw in a press release. "We're like them to realize that they could be taking something into the forest that affects our native ecosystems. ‘Oh‘a are the backbone of our native rainforest; they feed the honeycreepers, they protect the watershed. I can't imagine a Hawaiian rainforest without ‘ohi‘a."

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More than 50 signs are expected to be posted at every DOFAW trailhead on the Big Island as well as on Na Ala Hele trailheads on Maui.

The signs recommend that visitors to the trails:

> Clean gear before and after their visit by brushing off all dirt from shoes and gear and spraying with 70 percent rubbing alcohol, particularly if you have hiked on Hawaii island in the last two years.

> Clean vehicles by removing all soil and washing tires and undercarriages with detergent.

> Every hiker could be a potential carrier, so every hiker is responsible for taking the proper care not to spread the fungus.

ROD Trail Head Sign

Related Video:

Posted in Conservation, Forest, native plants | Comments Off on Saving ‘ohi‘a lehua

12 tons of trash

By
May 23rd, 2016



Overview of the marine debris pile collected from Midway Atoll. Photo courtesy NOAA.

Overview of the marine debris pile collected from Midway Atoll. Photo courtesy NOAA.

Located about 750 miles further northwest of Kauai, Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument is one of the largest marine conservation areas in the world. It is home to more than 7,000 marine species, one quarter of which are found only in the Hawaiian isles.

It's remote and the waters are pristine, except for the sheer amount of derelict fishing nets and plastic litter that land upon the monument's tiny isles, atolls and coral reefs.

From mid-April to May, a team of 10 NOAA scientists conducted shoreline marine debris surveys at Midway, Kure, Pearl and Hermes atolls, Lisianski Island and French Frigate Shoals. A total of 24,123 pounds — or about 12 tons — were removed from those shorelines.

Derelict fishing net and plastic debris at Midway Atoll, Eastern Island. Courtesy NOAA.

Derelict fishing net and plastic debris at Midway Atoll, Eastern Island. Courtesy NOAA.

Among the items were 1,843 derelict fishing nets or net fragments, 1,468 plastic beverage bottles, 4,457 bottle caps, 570 shoes and slippers (flip-flops), 535 cigarette lighters, 485 toothbrushes and other personal care products and 8,452 hard plastic fragments.

Plastic cigarette lighters picked up from Midway Atoll. Courtesy NOAA.

Plastic cigarette lighters picked up from Midway Atoll. Courtesy NOAA.

The team brought the marine debris back for a sorting event for schoolchildren at the NOAA Inouye Regional Center on Ford Island in Pearl Harbor. Students in third to sixth grade helped sort plastic bottles, bottle caps, toothbrushes and other non-hazardous debris. The NOAA Marine Debris team and its partners hope to educate Hawaii's youth on the negative impacts of consuming single-use plastics and to become the leading example for future generations.

Plastics brought back from Papahanaumokuakea will be recycled for use in art displays and manufactured goods, while the fishing nets will be sent to Hawaii's Nets to Energy Program to be repurposed as fuel.

NOAA has been removing marine debris from the Northwestern Hawaiian islands since 1996. Over the past 20 years, agency staff and partners have removed a total of 848 metric tons (or 1.9 million pounds) of derelict fishing gear and plastics from Paphanaumokuakea.

Marine debris team at work, Midway Atoll, Sand Island. Courtesy NOAA.

Marine debris team at work, Midway Atoll, Sand Island. Courtesy NOAA.

Layson albatross and chick examine plastic debris. Midway Atoll. Courtesy NOAA.

Laysan albatross and chick examine plastic debris. Midway Atoll. Courtesy NOAA.

Elementary school students help sort plastic debris gathered at Papahanaumokuakea at Ford Island headquarters. Courtesy NOAA.

Elementary school students help sort plastic debris gathered at Papahanaumokuakea at Ford Island headquarters. Courtesy NOAA.

Posted in Conservation, marine debris, Papahanaumokuakea | Comments Off on 12 tons of trash

808 Earth Day Roundup

By
April 15th, 2016



Courtesy NASA, earthobservatory.nasa.gov. Captured by the MODIS on NASA's Terra satellite Jan. 2014.

Courtesy NASA, earthobservatory.nasa.gov. Captured by the MODIS on NASA's Terra satellite Jan. 2014.

Earth Day falls on April 22, 2016. Nowadays, people like to celebrate it during the entire month. But of course, Earth Day is every day.

The first Earth Day took place on April 22, 1970, with approximately 20 million people taking place across the U.S. through demonstrations in the streets or parks for environmental causes. The celebration has since gone global. If you're interested in learning more about Earth Day history, CNN Library offers some fast facts.

Here are some ways to celebrate in the 808 (Hawaii).

10 a.m.-4 p.m., Friday, April 22: University of Hawaii at Manoa's Earth Day Festival offers an inspiring day of music, art, yoga and celebration of earth stewardship at the Campus Center and Legacy Path. Connect through Facebook.

9-11 a.m., Friday, April 22: Earth Day at Turtle Bay Resort. Celebrate Earth Day at Turtle Bay with a guided hike to Kahuku Point by the North Shore Community Land Trust followed by a beach cleanup, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Check in at 8:45 a.m. at the Guidepost experiential center, Turtle Bay Resort. Cleanup followed by a complimentary light lunch. From 7 to 8 p.m. in the evening, free diver Ocean Ramsey conducts a Talk Story on shark conservation at Surfer, The Bar. ($5 donation requested).

8:45-11 a.m., Saturday, April 23: 8th Annual Ka Iwi Clean-Up: Clean the Ka Iwi Shoreline with Rep. Gene Ward, former Peace Corps Volunteers, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Kaiser High School, Friends of Ka Iwi and 808 Cleanups. Meet at Alan Davis Wall. Picinic lunch to follow at Maunalua Bay. Bags, gloves and water provided.

9 a.m.-2 p.m., Saturday, April 23: Mauka to Makai Environmental Expo, Waikiki Aquarium. Interactive booths, including the Journey Home puppet show, a story about Apoha the o‘opu and friends, free native Hawaiian plants (first come, first serve) and complimentary water stations for guests who bring refillable bottles. More info at this link.

8 a.m.-11 a.m. Saturday, April 23: Sea Life Park beach cleanup takes place across from the park on the other side of Kalanianaole Highway. Public is invited to help clean the shoreline. First 50 participants will be invited to visit Sea Life Park free of charge following the event, while others will be offered a special rate of $9.50 for the day. Please bring gloves and a bucket instead of plastic bags to store trash. Free parking at Sea Life Park lot. Show bucket to the attendant.

9:30 a.m.-12 p.m., Sunday, April 24: Magic Island Beach Cleanup. The Honolulu Museum of Art and Kokua Hawai‘i Foundation invite the public to join a beach cleanup at Magic Island, Ala Moana Beach Park. Bring a reusable water bottle, hat and sunscreen. Check in at Picnic Site 30. Refreshments served at the end of cleanup.

9 a.m.-4 p.m., Saturday, April 30: Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii and partners bring you the Earth Day Festival and Ultimate Sand Sifter Competition. Check in time is 9 a.m. at Waimanalo Beach Park. Groups will fan out and clean windward shorelines from Makapu‘u to Bellows. Finalists from the sand sifter competition will also be on hand to showcase their design ideas for getting micro-plastics off the beach. Visit sustainablecoastlineshawaii.org.

April 18-22: Earth Week at Hawai‘i Pacific University. 

5:30-7:30 p.m., Monday, April 18: David M. Berube delivers the presidential lecture series on global leadership and sustainability, entitled "Emerging Technologies, Energy and Public Engagement."

11 a.m.-1 p.m., Wednesday, April 20: Earth Week Fair at HPU's Center Atrium, with various local organizations. Visit hpu.edu/sustainability.

12-1 p.m., Friday, April 22: HPU Libraries "Seed Project." Share a love for seeds. "Take, leave, whatevas..." Win a plant and make a gecko bookmark. Atherton Library, Hawaii Loa Campus.

5:30-6:30 p.m., Friday, April 22: Food Waste Prevention Presentation followed by sustainability and healthy living education presented by Pono Home. Hawaii Loa Campus Dining Commons.

Posted in Earth Day, Green events | Comments Off on 808 Earth Day Roundup

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