The Green Leaf

Waste wipeout

February 17th, 2016
Waste diversion pop-up tent set up by Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii. Courtesy SCH.

Waste diversion pop-up tent set up by Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii. Courtesy SCH.

The tally is in.

Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii released a final analysis of the amount of waste it was able to divert during the 2016 Volcom Pipe Pro at Pipeline from Jan. 28 to Feb. 7. Total: 1,365 pounds.

The grassroots non-profit group set up more than 10 waste diversion systems (pop-up recycling tents) along the coastline and collected the 1,365 pounds over the three-day contest period. Of that total, 1,004 pounds were sent to be recycled or composted, while 361 pounds went to H-POWER. Compostable materials were sent to Waihuena Farm on the North Shore to be transformed into soil.

"Although we primarily focus on plastic pollution issues through coastal cleanups," said Kahi Pacarro, director of SCH, "the partnerships to reduce event impacts on communities means reaching a larger audience to share the issues of over consumption and our throw away culture. We hope our work influences more people to inspect their own waste stream and see where they can reduce the amount of trash they create. Even more, get fired up to join us at an upcoming cleanup!"

Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii also set up an Education Station, made from a modified 20-foot shipping container to help educate people about plastic pollution and waste. The station was open to the public every night that the competition ran.

Sustainable Coastline Hawaii's Education Station, made from a modified 20-foot shipping container, serves as a mobile classroom and movie screen to educate others about plastic pollution and marine debris. Courtesy SCH.

Sustainable Coastline Hawaii's Education Station, made from a modified 20-foot shipping container, serves as a mobile classroom and movie screen to educate others about plastic pollution and marine debris. Courtesy SCH.

With thousands of spectators and participants converging on Oahu's North Shore, there's bound to be a lot of throwaway waste, unless the organizers take initiative. The Vans Triple Crown of Surfing, designated a Deep Blue Surfing Event for the third year, also made an effort to divert waste from the landfill in partnership with SCH.

Here's the larger picture on waste diversion for all of the Vans Triple Crown of Hawaii, which took place on Oahu's North Shore from Nov. 12 to Dec. 20, with three major surf contests.

>> Triple Crown offered Flowater drinking stations to help divert 36,000 plastic water bottles.

>> Food waste went to Waihuena Farm, an organic farm on the North Shore that turned it into compost. Ke Nui Kitchen, which caters the contest, in turn purchased its produce from the farm, closing the loop.

>> Contest event banners were upcycled into bags and totes by Honolulu manufacturer Mafia Bags.

>> Organizers used 70 percent biodiesel  sourced from Hawaii-based Pacific Biodiesel for its transportation needs.

>> Triple Crown donated $41,000 to local schools, youth education and environmental protection of the North Shore, as well as $40,000 for renovations of the public restrooms at Haleiwa Beach Park.

>> Purchased 944 tons of CO2 offsets from the Valdivian Coastal Conservation Reserve in coastal Chile to offset the carbon footprint of travel, hotel accommodations and energy use to power the events.

Mick Fanning of Australia wins at Sunset. Courtesy World Surf League.

Mick Fanning of Australia wins at Sunset. Courtesy World Surf League.

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