Archive for May, 2015

Waimanalo beach

By
May 25th, 2015



Nalodebris

So, there you have it.

Prof. Stephen Leatherman of Florida, aka Dr.  Beach, has put Waimanalo Beach Park at the top of his annual "Top 10" beach list. A recent Associated Press story spoke of Waimanalo's "powdery white coral sand" glowing in the morning light.

Sure, the bay is beautiful, as are the sands — until, that is, you see the cigarette butts.

There they were over Memorial Day weekend, more than 12, all near the base of an ironwood tree. Someone, or some persons, apparently smoked a whole pack right there, leaving their butts in the sand, even though smoking has been banned at all city beaches and parks on Oahu.

Buttsinbag

Of course, there were cigarette butts also strewn along the naupaka planted at the top of the shoreline.

This is actually along one of the beach access points along the stretch of Waimanalo Beach, and not the one near the homeless encampment closer to the city's parking lot, lifeguard station and restrooms, which also need help.

Has Dr. Beach actually walked along Waimanalo Beach? I know he's aware of marine debris issues. The windward side of Oahu actually rakes in most of the debris from throughout the Pacific. This was documented by NOAA's aerial marine survey. Of the 176 debris sites recorded during the survey, 171 were on the windward side of islands. Kahuku has the most dense accumulation of debris, but the beaches of Waimanalo also get a good share of it.

Dr. Leatherman was quoted by the Associated Press as saying: "Cigarette butts are the number one form of litter on beaches – plastics in terms of volume but in terms of numbers it's cigarette butts — so I'm starting to give beaches extra credit for no smoking."

Well, Dr. Beach, marine debris is pretty much embedded all along the shoreline of Waimanalo Beach. Walk along the shoreline and you will see small bits of plastic — blue, light blue, white — itty, bitty pieces of plastic film (perhaps from shopping bags?), pieces of worn out string and pieces of straw embedded in the fine sand.

Look closely, and you will see it.

butts

Once, standing at the shoreline, I watched as larger chunks of marine debris danced along the waves. Among them: what looked like corners of plastic boxes, a rice paddle and bottle caps. Eventually, the ocean spat these pieces out on to the shore — other pieces continued to dance in the waves.

On windy days, this is also a spot where you should watch out for stinging Portuguese man-o-wars.

As far as larger chunks of litter go, there was a water bottle, a forgotten baseball cap crusted with sand and half of a boogie board left on shore. So next time you visit Waimanalo Beach, pick up some of this debris or litter along the shoreline and help make it a better place. There's a non-profit called 808 Cleanups that encourages you to do so, and to post it to social media.

I think Dr. Beach should compile a list of the "Top 10 Beaches to Clean," and most certainly, Waimanalo Beach should be on it.

NaloBeach

 

 

Posted in beach cleanup, marine debris, Ocean | Comments Off on Waimanalo beach

Inspiring #808cleanups

By
May 11th, 2015



The original group of hikers behind 808 cleanups  beneath Koko Crater Arch.  Photo courtesy 808 Cleanups.

The original group of hikers behind 808 cleanups beneath Koko Crater Arch. 808 Cleanups founder Michael David Loftin, in red T-shirt, top. Photo courtesy 808 Cleanups.

While keeping tabs on breaking news stories, I've been wondering why there seem to have been so many hiking-related injuries and fatalities in recent months.

Some blame social media and the Internet for leading thrill-seekers and inexperienced hikers to unsanctioned trails that were formerly known to more experienced or knowledgeable hikers. Is it social media's fault? Is it today's quest to capture the coolest selfie, teetering on the edge of a mountain ridge? I don't know the answers. I know that plenty of experienced hikers from the Hawaiian Trail and Mountain Club have been going on some of these trails for years, without incident. Sometimes, I think it's just an unfortunate accident. No matter what, any hiking accident is tragic.

But social media can also be used in a positive way.

The Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources has taken the strategy of using social media to warn people of the dangers of hiking Sacred Falls with this video. Interestingly, landowner Kamahameha Schools took a different tactic, sending out "cease and desist" requests, according to this Hawaii News Now report, asking more than a dozen bloggers to stop promoting hiking trails on their properties. The resulting consequences are sad – Mariner's Ridge, one of my favorite hikes on Oahu (and the one where I met my husband), is now fenced off.

Today's column features a non-profit called 808 Cleanups, which was founded by a group of avid hikers who want to use social media for good.

Founder Michael David Loftin and his friends first became concerned when they found nature tagging below Koko Crater Arch. They decided to do something about it — clean it up, educate and encourage others to steward these beautiful places on Oahu.

The mission of 808 Cleanups is "to empower communities in restoring their natural environments through decentralized beach, graffiti, hiking trail and marine debris cleanups." Volunteers from 808 Cleanups are "striving to keep these areas beautiful for future generations" through an Adopt a Site program, education and political advocacy.

So, with a decentralized philosophy, anyone can lead a beach cleanup — whether you're a party of one and two or a party of 20.

"808 Cleanups can occur many ways," said Loftin, a Peace Corps veteran and lifelong environmentalist. "I would say 80 percent are people doing their own cleanups wherever they are. Sharing the stories is really important even if its' a small cleanup."

Taking your dog for a walk on the beach? Make sure you pick up after your dog, of course, and pick up some marine debris on the shoreline while you're at it. Going for a hike with some friends? Pick up any litter that you see along the trails and carry it out with you. The philosophy is to leave it better than when you got there.

Post it to Facebook, Instagram and Twitter with #808cleanups and inspire others to do the same.

Follow the Leave No Trace outdoors ethic.

If people are using social media to find formerly unknown hikes, Loftin figures it can also be used to encourage people to respect nature and be responsible hikers and stewards of nature. The goal, he says, is to "make it better than when you found it."

808 Cleanup volunteers recently helped clean layers of trash from Tantalus Lookout (getting the community and Hawaii Discovery Tours involved), bonfire debris from Kaiwi Shoreline and continue to steward Liliuokalani Botanical Park, a city park that has also been neglected. Volunteers who clean a site at least twice a month and post to social media can get a free cleanup kit from 808 Cleanups' sponsor, Home Depot. Loftin usually meets volunteers on site to deliver the cleanup kits.

Find 808 Cleanup's calendar here. 808 cleanups is on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Related Videos:
Intro to 808 Cleanups

Pride Rock cleanup (Lanikai pillbox hike)

Bike Month 2015

By
May 7th, 2015



BikeMonth

May is National Bike Month.

The Hawaii Bicycling League kicked off with a celebration at Mother Waldron Park in Kakaako on Saturday, May 2. On Mother's Day Sunday, the bicycling league celebrates with a ride around Kapiolani Park from 9 to 11 a.m. Bike to Work Day is Friday, May 15.

Here's a list of ways to celebrate Bike Month:

May 10th – Sunday – CycloFemme – 9am-11am – Kapiolani Park – 3921 Paki Ave

Join the Red Hot Ladies and HBL this mother’s day to unite riders of all ages, genders, ethnicities, or abilities to share the joy of cycling. CycloFemme is an international event designed to encourage more females to ride bicycles. “Man”bassadors welcome too! There will be 3 different ride lengths, something for everyone!

CycloFemme

May 15th – Friday – Bike to Work Day – 7am-9am – Thomas Square & N. Blaisdell Park Aiea

Commute to work via bicycle and stop by one of our two Energizer Stations along the way! HBL volunteers and community partners will be handing out coffee, snacks, & lots of aloha!

May 15th – Friday – Bike Month Pau Hana – 5pm-8pm – Kaka’ako Agora

Come start your Friday night off right with a bicycle themed party! Raffle and door prizes for those who use the free bike valet! We’ll be projecting bicycle movies, listening to great music, and enjoying food & drinks for small donation! Also enjoy a presentation from two cyclists pedaling around the world!

May 17th – Family Sunday at Honolulu Museum of Art – 11am-3pm

Come enjoy free admission to the “Hot Wheels” bicycle themed Family Sunday. Local groups and businesses will have bike activities, including balance bikes, rides down the cycle track, a bicycle matching game, and more. Sure to be fun for the whole family! Ride your bicycle and use the free bike valet!

May 24th – Sunday – Bike to the Zoo – 9am-2pm – Honolulu Zoo

The city and county of Honolulu is offering free admission to all who bike to the zoo! HBL is providing free bike valet!

May - September – National Bike Challenge – HBL is Local Challenge Host for Hawaii!

May marks the beginning of the 2015 National Bike Challenge. Thousands of riders from across the country will log their miles and join in friendly competition to see who can ride the most & furthest! Track using popular apps like Strava or enter manually. Compete for local and national prizes! Create workplace, school, or community teams and challenge them to ride every day!

Workshops & Presentations Calendar

May 9 (Saturday) 10:30-11:30 @ Aina Haina Public Library: Why Ride a Bicycle? Presentation

May 9 (Saturday) Hawaii Railways Society Volunteer Project - More info to come.

May 9 (Saturday) 2-3pm @ Manoa Public Library: Everyday Cycling Presentation

May 12 (Tuesday) 6-6:30pm @ Kahuku Public Library: Everyday Cycling Presentation

May 16 (Saturday) 3-5pm @ KCC: Efficient Riding Skills

May 17 (Sunday) 2-4pm @ UH: Cycling Skills 101

May 17 (Sunday) 4-6pm @ UH: Efficient Riding Skills

May 20 (Wednesday) 5:30-7:30pm @ HBL Office: Basic Bike Maintenance

May 24 (Sunday) 9:00-11:00am: Cycling Skills 101 Kailua

May 30 (Saturday) 10-11am @ Manoa Public Library: Staying Alert through Cycling presentation

 

Posted in Bike Month, BIke to Work Day, Biking | Comments Off on Bike Month 2015

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