The Green Leaf

Invasive: Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle

September 9th, 2014
The coconut rhinoceros beetle could potentially destroy Waikiki's coconut palms, changing its landscape forever. It's already been detected at Joint base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. Not to be confused with other beetles also found in Hawaii. Photo of Department of Agriculture display by Nina Wu.

The coconut rhinoceros beetle could potentially destroy Waikiki's coconut palms, changing its landscape forever. It's already been detected at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. Not to be confused with other beetles also found in Hawaii. Photo of Department of Agriculture display by Nina Wu.

Watch out for the coconut rhinoceros beetle!

The invasive beetle was first detected Dec. 23, 2013 on coconut trees at a golf course at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. Now the U.S. Navy is working with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, University of Hawaii at Manoa and Hawaii Department of Agriculture to monitor, trap and control them. Some 56 palms were removed at the base.

The beetles have also been detected at Barbers Point and Campbell Industrial Park.

If you've seen these lantern-like things hanging from trees around Oahu, those are coconut rhino beetle traps set out by the state Department of Agriculture. You can find a map of all Coconut Rhino Beetle monitoring efforts and activities here.

CRB-Pic

The large scarab beetle is native to Southeast Asia, was accidentally introduced from Sri Lanka to Samoa in 1909 and is now distributed throughout the South Pacific. The coconut rhinoceros beetle (CRB) is one of the most damaging pests for coconut palms, as well as for Hawaii's native, endangered loulu palms.

How did they get to Hawaii? We still don't know.

It is dark brown and measures 1 1/4 to 2 1/2 inches long. The larvae are white with a brown head. It can often be confused with other beetles present in Hawaii, including the Oriental flower beetle and mango flower beetle (both a little smaller). The largest beetle in the world, by the way, is the Goliath beetle (not in Hawaii, thankfully) which can weight 100 grams and grow to 20 centimeters long.

When looking for places to pupate (transforming from larvae to adult), the Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle looks for a quiet, dark place, whether it be in someone's garage or laundry room, according to Rob Curtiss, acting state plant pest control branch manager. Adult rhino beetles are also active at night and can fly (shudder).

The beetles bore into the center of a palm tree's crown to feed on sap, cutting through developing leaves and causing damage to the fronds. Affected fronds grow with distinctive, V-shaped cuts.

If you suspect the presence of Coconut Rhinoceros Beetles on coconut and palms, report it to the PEST hotline, 643-PEST. Do not move potentially affected mulch or trimmings. If you see a dislodged CRB trap you can report it to a hotline, 832-0585 or email stoprhino@gmail.com.

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