Archive for September, 2014

Window A/C rebates

By
September 25th, 2014



 

WindowAC

Summer's officially over, but if you're still trying to cool your heels in the isles, Hawaii Energy is offering $50 rebates for anyone who trades up to an EnergyStar-rated window air conditioner.

Hawaii Energy, a ratepayer-funded energy conservation and efficiency program, is offering a $50 rebate for individuals who swap out an old working unit for a more energy efficient one. They're available on a first-come, first-served basis, but the perk is free pick-up and haul-away of the old A/C unit.

The rebates are available on Oahu, Maui and the Big Island, but not Lanai or Molokai (sorry, folks).

To qualify, your unit must be EnergyStar rated and have an energy efficiency ratio of 10.8 or higher.

It's easy.

1. Pick up an application at the time of purchase of an EnergyStar A/C unit from participating retailers, including Lowe's, Sears, NEX, Home Depot and City Mill.

2. Schedule a pick-up of your old A/C unit for recycling by calling 537-5577 or (877) 231-8222.

3. Send your completed rebate application and original receipt via snail mail to Hawaii Energy, P.O. Box 3920, Honolulu, HI 96812. The rebate should arrive in the mail in eight to 10 weeks.

The switch could save you about $80 per year on your electric bill (though savings vary depending on the make, model and usage of your window A/C unit).

If you're getting a split-air A/C system, there are $150 rebates available for variable refrigerant flow air conditioners up to 24,000 BTU, and $250 rebates for units from 24,001 to 36,000 BTU. They must have a minimum SEER rating of 16.

Questions? See if the answer is in the FAQ list.

 

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About those fire ants

By
September 10th, 2014



So the last we heard, the invasive Little Fire Ants were in Mililani Mauka.

But keep your guard up, because who knows where they'll turn up next?

They might turn up in your neighborhood. When they were discovered in Waimanalo during the summer, only Waimanalo folks were concerned. As of now, the samples coming in (about 10 per week) are from Mililani. It's possible they may have gone undetected in Mililani for a few years.

The Little Fire Ants, originally from South America, not only deliver a painful sting, but can blind animals and reduce biodiversity. If these ants become established in Hawaii, they would be Hawaii's most devastating pest. Nesting seabirds and sea turtle hatchlings are also under threat. We do not want these to be established on our island. Small populations can still be eradicated if detected early enough.

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Not to be confused with the tropical fire ant, the Little Fire Ant is half the size (one-sixtheenth of an inch or about as long as the width of a penny). For more information, visit lfa-hawaii.org.

The Little Fire Ants were first discovered in Puna in 1999 and have since spread, hidden in plants, logs, green waste, gravel and sometimes, even cars. In December 2013, they were discovered in hapuu logs at nurseries and garden shops on Oahu and Maui, and in landscaping on Lanai. Most of the hapuu sold to the public remain unaccounted for.

What can you do about it?

Test your home and yard. You can do this by placing a thin smear of peanut butter on disposable chopsticks - place them every few feet in and around plants in your yard, garden and lanai. Focus on shady, moist areas, bottoms of pots and where plants' leaves meet the stem. Leave the sticks in place for one hour during the cool part of the day. Check the sticks without moving them, and collect if:

>> Ants are uniformly orange/red and very small.

>> If you're unsure about the ants.

As of right now, the Department of Agriculture is responding to every sample sent in. Better to have plenty of samples that turn out not to be Little Fire Ants than to miss opportunities to detect and eradicate them. We need to remain vigilant.

Place the ants directly into a zipock bag, seal, label with your name, address and phone number and freeze overnight. Here's a link to a brochure and video for further instructions.

Immediately report any suspected LFA to the Hawaii Department of Agriculture hotline 643-PEST.

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Invasive: Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle

By
September 9th, 2014



The coconut rhinoceros beetle could potentially destroy Waikiki's coconut palms, changing its landscape forever. It's already been detected at Joint base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. Not to be confused with other beetles also found in Hawaii. Photo of Department of Agriculture display by Nina Wu.

The coconut rhinoceros beetle could potentially destroy Waikiki's coconut palms, changing its landscape forever. It's already been detected at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. Not to be confused with other beetles also found in Hawaii. Photo of Department of Agriculture display by Nina Wu.

Watch out for the coconut rhinoceros beetle!

The invasive beetle was first detected Dec. 23, 2013 on coconut trees at a golf course at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. Now the U.S. Navy is working with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, University of Hawaii at Manoa and Hawaii Department of Agriculture to monitor, trap and control them. Some 56 palms were removed at the base.

The beetles have also been detected at Barbers Point and Campbell Industrial Park.

If you've seen these lantern-like things hanging from trees around Oahu, those are coconut rhino beetle traps set out by the state Department of Agriculture. You can find a map of all Coconut Rhino Beetle monitoring efforts and activities here.

CRB-Pic

The large scarab beetle is native to Southeast Asia, was accidentally introduced from Sri Lanka to Samoa in 1909 and is now distributed throughout the South Pacific. The coconut rhinoceros beetle (CRB) is one of the most damaging pests for coconut palms, as well as for Hawaii's native, endangered loulu palms.

How did they get to Hawaii? We still don't know.

It is dark brown and measures 1 1/4 to 2 1/2 inches long. The larvae are white with a brown head. It can often be confused with other beetles present in Hawaii, including the Oriental flower beetle and mango flower beetle (both a little smaller). The largest beetle in the world, by the way, is the Goliath beetle (not in Hawaii, thankfully) which can weight 100 grams and grow to 20 centimeters long.

When looking for places to pupate (transforming from larvae to adult), the Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle looks for a quiet, dark place, whether it be in someone's garage or laundry room, according to Rob Curtiss, acting state plant pest control branch manager. Adult rhino beetles are also active at night and can fly (shudder).

The beetles bore into the center of a palm tree's crown to feed on sap, cutting through developing leaves and causing damage to the fronds. Affected fronds grow with distinctive, V-shaped cuts.

If you suspect the presence of Coconut Rhinoceros Beetles on coconut and palms, report it to the PEST hotline, 643-PEST. Do not move potentially affected mulch or trimmings. If you see a dislodged CRB trap you can report it to a hotline, 832-0585 or email stoprhino@gmail.com.

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The infamous albizia

By
September 8th, 2014



A fallen Albizia tree in Hilo. Star-Advertiser file photo/ August 2013.

A fallen Albizia tree in Hilo. Star-Advertiser file photo/ August 2013.

By now, the albizia tree (Falcataria moluccana) has taken center stage in the list of invasive species the public is aware of and interested in eradicating.

Following the wrath of tropical storm Iselle, the alien tree species has been fingered as the culprit for toppled power lines and damage in Puna on the Big Island, as reported earlier in an Aug. 20 story in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser. Officials estimated at least 90 percent of trees that caused damage in the Aug. 7 tropical storm were albizias, trees native to Indonesia that have shallow roots and brittle branches.

"It's not going to go away," said Tracy Johnson, a research entomologist for the U.S. Forest Reserve, who has been working to eradicate them for more than a decade. "There's no way we can remove every tree and be done with it. It's going to remain here, so we have to manage it. Ideally, what we would like to find is a biocontrol that can limit its ability to spread so the problem doesn't get any worst. We're hoping to find something that attacks the flowers, the fruit of the tree."

It's not the first time that it's happened, of course. In the aftermath of tropical storm Flossie last summer, an albizia tree in Hilo fell over, pictured above. An albizia fell over a residential street in Puna in 2010, destroying power ilnes and fences. Albizia trees fell over on Kauai in 2009, dropping on to cars and a house.

Most people probably did't notice the albizias before they fell. After all, they're not unsightly. They aren't on the O‘ahu Invasive Species Committee's list of priority target pests.

Here are some facts about albizias:

>> The trees, native to Indonesia, were first introduced to Hawaii in 1917 by botanist Joseph Rock.

>> They were planted in Manoa valley to provide shade. On Oahu, they can  also be found along Pali and Likelike Highways, not an ideal situation.

>> They grow up to 150 feet, have weak wood and tend to grow top-heavy canopies that overwhelm native species. They dramatically increase inputs of nitrogen, displacing native trees.

Johnson  just received a $100,000 state grant to search for biocontrol agents that can help control the trees, but that's just the beginning to finding a solution, he said of a five to 10-year process or longer. He'll be searching for natural albizia enemies in Indonesia, the Soloman Islands and Papua New Guinea. Ideally, a biocontrol that attacks the albizia flowers to limits its ability to spread.

With a focus on protecting the native forests on Hawaii island, Johnson's work also involves efforts to eradicate other invasive trees and shrubs that take over quickly, choking out native trees and plants, such as:

>> Strawberry guava: Native to southeastern Brazil, brought to Hawaii in 1825 for its fruit and ornamental attributes. Occurs on all six of Hawaii's largest isles, poses a major threat to Hawaii's endemic flora and fauna. Forms impenetrable thickets and can alter water production and provide refuge for fruit flies.

>>  Miconia: On Hawaii's list of most invasive horticultural plants.  Originally from south and central America, this prolific seeder poses a threat to Oahu's forested watershed.

>> Clidemia: Also known as Koster's curse, this invasive shrub from central and South America forms dense thickets in tropical forest understories. It has spread to Oahu, the Big Island, Molokai, Maui, Kauai and Lanai.

 

Monk seal hospital: grand opening

By
September 6th, 2014



Hawaiian monk seals Kulia and Ikaika in the pool at Ke Kai Ola. The young seals were transported from the Northwestern Hawaiian Isles, malnourished,  to the hospital, then fed, and released back home at the end of August. Photo by Sarah van Schagen, NMFS permit 16632-00.

Hawaiian monk seals Kulia and Ikaika in the pool at Ke Kai Ola. The malnourished seal pups were transported from the Northwestern Hawaiian Isles to the hospital in Kona. The seals were able to gain weight, and were released back in the NWHI Aug. 31. Photo by Sarah van Schagen, NMFS permit 16632-00.

 

Ke Kai Ola, the new Hawaiian monk seal hospital in Kona, held its grand opening and blessing on Sept. 2.

The Marine Mammal Center's new, $3.2 million facility, which means the healing sea in Hawaiian, is dedicated to giving sick and injured Hawaiian monk seals a second chance.

Four young, malnourished monk seals — Kulia, Ikaika, Hala‘i and Maka‘alawere admitted to Ke Kai Ola on July 9 after being rescued from the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. The center's vet experts and trained volunteers cared for the seals until they were healthy enough to return to the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Aug. 31.

Previously, malnourished pups like the four were left behind to fend for themselves by scientists, who had no place to take them.

"We built this hospital to save a species," said Jeff Boehm, executive director of The Marine Mammal; Center. "Thenks to funding from the Firedoll Foundation as well as a generous family foundation and hundreds of donors throughout the world, this hospital can now provide life-saving medical care."

The Hawaiian monk seal population hovers at about 1,100, with fewer than one in five pups surviving their first year in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands due to threats like marine debris entanglement, changes in the food chain and predators.

The center has partnered with the  NOAA's National  Marine Fisheries Service to help save the monk seals. It will also offer public outreach programs with the help of community volunteers. Visit www.marinemammalcenter.org to learn more.

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