Archive for November, 2013

Handmade Wreaths at Lyon Arboretum

By
November 22nd, 2013



Beautiful handcrafted evergreen wreath by a member of Hui Hana Hawai‘i will be on sale at Lyon Arboretum this coming Saturday (Nov. 23).

Beautiful handcrafted evergreen wreath by a member of Hui Hana Hawai‘i will be on sale at Lyon Arboretum this coming Saturday (Nov. 23).

There is a flurry of activity going on at the University of Hawaii at Manoa's Lyon Arboretum.

More than a dozen, talented crafters make up Hui Hana Hawai‘i, a group of volunteers that meets weekly to create lei and other works of art from natural materials, to benefit the Lyon Arboretum at 3860 Manoa Rd. For the past few weeks, they have been busy weaving beautiful holiday wreaths which will be for sale at the annual Holiday Plant and Craft Sale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the arboretum this coming Saturday (Nov. 23).

It's the perfect opportunity to find a locally-made, handcrafted gift for the holidays.

Evergreen wreaths are made from a combination of trees and plants, including Norfolk pine, Thuja pine and Hollywood cypress, decorated with holly, Eucalyptus pods, pine cones, lipstick tree buds and Christmas berries.

Beautiful handcrafted bromeliad wreath will be part of Lyon Arboretum's annual sale on Saturday.

Beautiful handcrafted bromeliad wreath will be part of Lyon Arboretum's annual sale on Saturday.

Dried wreaths, made of a combination of natural materials, including pine cones, autograph pods and various leaves, are also available at the sale.

The price range is between $20 to $50 each, with proceeds benefiting Lyon Arboretum.

Handcrafted, dried wreath will be available for sale at the Lyon Arboretum on Saturday.

This one-of-a-kind, handcrafted, dried wreath will be available for sale at the Lyon Arboretum on Saturday.

Several participating nurseries will also be on hand, selling colorful ti varieties, cacti and succulents, orchids, anthuriums, heliconias, gingers, native Hawaiian plants, vegetable and herb plants, as well as University of Hawaii variety vegetable seeds. Ceramic pots and planters, as well as tasty jams, jellies and Hawaiian honey will also be sale.

A free shuttle service to the arboretum will also be available Saturday, with pick-up and drop-off points at the intersections of Manoa Road and Po‘elua Street, and at Manoa Road, and Nipo Street. For more information, call 988-0456 or visit www.hawaii.edu/lyonarboretum.

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Helping Vans Triple Crown Go Eco

By
November 19th, 2013



Helping Triple Van Crown surfers and surf-goers recycle and tread responsibly on the ocean. Courtesy photo.

Helping Vans Triple Crown surfers and surf-goers recycle and tread responsibly on the ocean. Courtesy photo.

Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii is collaborating with Vans Triple Crown of Surfing on Oahu's North Shore to make this year's series of professional surfing events more eco-friendly and environmentally responsible.

The non-profit built custom, recycling and compost stations which will be on hand daily while the surf contests are going on. Members will also talk-story with event-goers about the impacts of plastic on coastal pollution.

Sustainablesurf.org brought Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii on board as part of their strategy to certify the Vans Triple Crown as a Deep Blue Surfing Event, which is a trademarked label for events with a certain set of green guidelines that focus on reducing waste, energy, transportation and impacts on climate change while increasing community support.

SCHtriplecrownTriple Crown, now in its 39th year, brings surfers and spectators from throughout the world to Oahu's North Shore, continuing a rich, surfing heritage of progression, high-performance and power surfing.

Throughout Triple Crown contest events (which started Nov. 12 and run until Dec. 20), including the Reef Hawaiian Pro, Vans World Cup and Billabong Pro, members of SCH will maintain the recycling and composting stations with the goal of diverting 40 percent of trash from the landfill and H-Power.

The crew will also educate competitors, staff and spectators on ways to reduce their impacts on the coastlines by sharing tips on reducing plastic and the destructive impact of single-use plastics.

SCH is also helping to reduce transportation costs.

Recyclables will be donated to families on the North Shore, while food scraps will be composted.

"Partnering with the Vans Triple Crown to increase awareness of the detriments of our overconsumption of plastic is directly in line with our mission of inspiring coastal stewardship," said SCH executive director Kahi Pacarro. "We believe cleaning the beach starts at home, and by encouraging the reduction of waste we can also improve coast quality. Fewer items entering the waste stream equals fewer items able to wash ashore."

To learn more about Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii, visit schawaii.org.

Posted in Green events, Ocean, Plastic, recycling | Comments Off on Helping Vans Triple Crown Go Eco

John Kelly Environmental Awards

By
November 16th, 2013



John Kelly awards print w lower logoThe Surfrider Foundation's Oahu chapter celebrates its 11th annual John Kelly Environmental Awards from 6 to 10:30 p.m. at Waimea Valley tonight (Saturday, Nov. 16).

Besides live music by Taimane and Cynth & the What's His Faces, dinner will be provided by Chef Thomas Naylor, with libations courtesy of Barefoot Wine & Bubbly and Kona Brewing Co. There will also be a silent auction. Proceeds benefit Surfrider Oahu and their efforts to preserve our coastline.

The annual awards dinner celebrates John Kelly, the legendary waterman and environmental leader who started Save Our Surf and fought to protect Hawaii's coastlines from overdevelopment. Kellyl and SOS helped save more than 140 surf sites in Hawaii.

Visit www.surfrider.org/oahu to purchase tickets online.

This year's awardees, selected for their work to bring about positive changes while protecting the marine environment, are:

>> Lifetime Achievement Award: Denise Antolini of the University of Hawaii's William S. Richardson School of Law, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Professor of Law, Regents' Medalist for Excellence in Teaching. Antolini is being honored for her recent and ongoing research and dedication to environmental law and conduct concerning local and international coastlines.

>> Hawaii-based Company Award: Black Cat Salon + Spa is being recognized for their efforts to reduce waste and reuse building materials as well as their environmentally friendly product line, Aveda. They participate in local beach cleanups and Aveda's Annual Earth Month.

>> Professional Surfer Award: Crystal Thornburg-Homcy of Haleiwa is an all-around ocean athlete and an ambassador for Patagonia. The accomplished longboarder holds a degree in Environmental Sciences, and also bodysurfs, freedives, kayaks and paddleboards. She and her husband, Dave Homcy, run an organic produce company called Crave Greens.

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America Recycles Day - Jack Johnson, Twitter

By
November 15th, 2013



ARD_IR_Logo_GreenandBlack_cmyk Nov. 15

Today (Friday, Nov. 15) is America Recycles Day.

Singer Jack Johnson and the Kokua Hawaii Foundation, in partnership with Schnitzer Steel Hawaii Corp., are hosting an Aloha Aina Recycling Drive at Sunset Beach Elementary School tomorrow on Saturday (Nov. 16.).

From 9 a.m. to noon, the drive (part of the Kokua Hawaii Foundation's 3R's School Recycling Program), will collect all types of scrap metal, including bicycles; computers and game systems; all types of batteries; newspaper; beverage bottles and corrugated cardboard; used cooking oil; clothing; printer cartridges; and used appliances.

Johnson will be on hand to assist with recycling collections. Sunset Beach Elementary School was the first to join Kokua's 3Rs recycling Program 10 years ago, when Johnson debuted his "Reduce, Reuse, Recycle" song at a school assembly in the cafeteria.

Meanwhile, the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) is taking to Twitter in an effort to encourage dialogue on how to increase recycling rates. The hashtag for America Recycles Day will be #ScrapChat, as experts from the industry offer resources and information on how recycling works.

It will take place from 2 to 3 p.m. Eastern time (9 to 10 a.m. Hawaii time).

The discussion will cover topics, including how to get more people to recycle, the biggest challenges to recycling and tips on recycling and upcycling. Questions can also be sent to @ISRI.

Here in Hawaii, meanwhile, Recycle Hawaii is working with Keep the Hawaiian Islands Beautiful and its local affiliates in Honolulu, Maui, Molokai, Lanai and Hawaii island to coordinate events that day.

Recycle-Bowl, a nationwide youth recycling competition from Oct. 21 to Nov. 15, is a great, interactive way for students to learn about waste reduction through in-school recycling. The competition is open to all elementary, middle and high schools, which track and report how much recyclable material they collect for a chance to win prizes. The school in each state that collects the most recyclable material per capital will win $1,000. Last year, that title went to Konawaena High School.

Visit www.americarecyclesday.org to learn more.

Konawaena High School won $1,000 last year for being the school with the highest recycling rate in the state. Photo by Renee Oba.

Konawaena High School won $1,000 last year for being the school with the highest recycling rate in the state. Photo by Renee Oba.

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Solar PV firm steps in for family

By
November 14th, 2013



KCCN personality Jason "Pipi" Rezentes and wife, Kaui, needed the help of solar PV to car for their special needs daughter, Ava, 10, who was born with spinal muscular atrophy..

KCCN personality Jason "Pipi" Rezentes and wife, Kaui, needed the help of solar PV to care for their daughter, Ava, 10, who was born with spinal muscular atrophy. Courtesy photo.

During these challenging times for the solar industry, it's cool to see some companies are still willing to step in and donate a system to families in need.

Energy Pro Hawaii did just that.

Earlier this summer, the Rezentes family had submitted a video depicting their daily lives to Enphase's Mahalo Hawaii campaign. Every day, Ava is hooked up to various machines which drive the electricity bill sky-high. The Rezentes family was one of the top video contenders for Enphases' competition, offering a Hawaii-based non-profit a solar photovoltaic system worth $25,000. The solar PV system eventually went to the La‘a Kea Foundation of Maui.

Both videos received more than 14,000 votes.

Seeing that there was a need, Energy Pro Hawaii consulted with Enphase and decided to step in and provide the Rezentes family with a solar PV system.

Energy Pro Hawaii is also campaigning to help Hawaii's students get cooler classsrooms. For every PV installation from now until the end of 2013, the company is offering a percentage of its proceeds to help public schools get air-conditioning.

Though the Hawaiian Electric Co. is putting up some hurdles by requiring homeowners in solar-saturated areas to pay for new transformers and equipment upgrades (to mitigate safety and reliability risks) out-of-pocket, a solar investment still makes sense as we move towards our clean-energy goals of 2030.

Solar power should be accessible to all if we are sincere about reaching our clean-energy goals. Earthjustice, a nonprofit public interest law organization, is challenging HECO's decision to charge customers for these upgrades. If you don't live in a solar-saturated area (or even if you do), it's still worth considering going solar by the end of the year.

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Part II: Pu‘uhonua — A Place of Refuge

By
November 12th, 2013



Kaimalino, or KE18, is now living in California. He was removed from Kure and Midway atolls after showing unnatural aggression towards female monk seals and pups. Photo courtesy Monk Seal Foundation.

Kaimalino, or KE18, is now living in California. He was removed from Kure and Midway atolls after showing unnatural aggression towards female monk seals and pups. Photo courtesy Monk Seal Foundation.

If Kauai Pup 2's story made anything clear, it's that Hawaiian monk seals belong in Hawaii.

In an effort to give Hawaiian monk seals like KP2 a home, the Monk Seal Foundation is spearheading efforts to create "Pu‘uhonua...A Place of Refuge" at Sea Life Park on Oahu. It's a place where the endangered Hawaiian monk seals who cannot return to the wild can find a safe home to live out the rest of their lives.

Rehabilitation and release are not always options, according to foundation president Patrick Wardell , due to critical injuries or other environmental factors. KP2, or Ho‘ailona is one example — the pup seal who became too friendly with the folks on Molokai bounced around several isles and was nursed by humans, but ultimately could not be returned to the wild due to poor eyesight. He eventually ended up in the care of scientist Terrie Williams at a marine mammal lab in Santa Cruz before finding his way back home, where he has since taken up residence at the Waikiki Aquarium.

The Monk Seal Foundation, a non-profit based in Lahaina, Maui, joined forces in March with the Hawaiian Monk Seal Response Team Oahu, united by their same mission of preserving the critically endangered Hawaiian monk seal for future generations.

Kaimalino is another recent example of a non-releasable seal. Wildlife officials removed him from Kure and Midway atolls in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands because he was unnaturally aggressive towards several females and their pups. He was temporarily held at Waikiki Aquarium and now lives in California.

Click here to learn more about the Pu‘uhonua Initiative.

Posted in Hawaiian monk seals, Marine Life | Comments Off on Part II: Pu‘uhonua — A Place of Refuge

Part I: A hospital for Hawaiian monk seals

By
November 11th, 2013



KP2, now known as Ho‘ailona, bounced around several locations in Hawaii before taking up residence at a Santa Cruz lab in California for two years. He is now a resident at the Waikiki Aquarium, where he serves as an ambassador for his species. Photo from marinemammalcenter.org.

KP2, now known as Ho‘ailona, bounced around several locations in Hawaii before taking up residence at a Santa Cruz lab in California for two years. He is now a resident at the Waikiki Aquarium, where he serves as an ambassador for his species. Photo from marinemammalcenter.org.

It's great to see a vision become reality — and maybe the tide is turning for our endangered Hawaiian monk seals.

The Marine Mammal Center of Sausalito, Calif. (north of San Francisco) expects to open the first phase of its new, $3.2 million monk seal hospital at the National Energy Laboratory of Hawaii (NELHA) in Kona by the end of this year.

The center, which has been rescuing marine mammals since 1975, including mostly harbor seals, elephant seals and sea lions from the California coast, has taken a keen interest in helping the endangered Hawaiian monk seals across the Pacific.

"We believe it's the right thing to do to help animals in need," said Jeff Boehm, the center's executive director.

With a population below 1,100 in the Hawaiian isles, the monk seal population is declining at a rate of about 4 percent per year. In the Northwestern Hawaiian islands, juveniles are prone to starvation, marine debris entanglement and shark predators. In the main Hawaiian islands, where more monk seals are being sighted, they have become victim to human-created hazards including fish hooks, nets and motor boats.

This Hawaiian monk seal was rescued after it was found with a hook. NOAA-Permit-932-190523319.

This Hawaiian monk seal ingested a fishing hook last year. NOAA Permit 932-1905233319.

In 2011 and 2012, several Hawaiian monk seals on Molokai and Kauai were killed intentionally by humans, considered both a state and federal offense due to its endangered status.

The facility, to be called "Ke Kai Ola" (The Healing Sea), broke ground in September of last year and should have four pools to accommodate injured monk seals. The pools have already been filled with water, according to Boehm, and could take an injured adult or orphaned pup.

The center needs another $700,000 to complete the second phase, which would include the buildout of a fish kitchen and lab, plus offices and an open-air visitor pavilion. Plans also call for solar photovoltaic panels, seawater air conditioning and seawater filtration infrastructure for the pools.

To help run operations, the center recently received a $25,000 grant from the Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund. Donations have come from throughout the globe, according to Boehm, with the Hawaiian monk seal capturing the heart of Bay Area philanthropists as well as schoolkids raising funds in their classrooms.

The Marine Mammal Center's mission is "to expand knowledge about marine mammals — their health and that of their ocean environment — and to inspire their global conservation."

Another component of the center's mission is expanding knowledge, which means partnering with scientists to help expand and advance scientific knowledge, as well as to educate the general public about marine mammals. In California, the center works with more than 1,000 volunteers and has successfully rehabilitated and released hundreds of animals back to the wild.

"We go down to the beaches and watch them move back into the Pacific Ocean," he said. "To be frank, there are tears, sometimes. It's a celebratory feeling."

Boehm says the center is looking forward to working with other non-profits, the community and schools in Hawaii.

"There are great partners in Hawaii doing work around the observations, monitoring and response to animals on the beach," said Boehm. "What there hasn't been is a dedicated place to take these animals."

Until now. Click here to learn more.

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Da Hui North Shore Beach Cleanup Nov. 9

By
November 7th, 2013



DaHuiFlyer

It's time again for the annual Da Hui North Shore Beach Cleanup on Saturday, Nov. 9.

Join Da Hui, Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii, Kokua Hawaii Foundation, The Eddie Aikau Foundation and Surfrider Foundation as they clean more than 15 miles of beaches stretching from Haleiwa Beach Park to Kahuku.

Check in time is 8 a.m. at Turtle Bay Resort (West Lawn, by the stables). Look for the educational booth (coffee will be provided.)

Teams leave for their clean-up zones at 8:30 a.m. and participate until 10:30 a.m., then return to the resort for a free BBQ and live music at 11 a.m., followed by a pro-surf autograph session. The musical lineup is a surprise.

Participants are also encouraged to bring one non-perishable food item to be donated to Hawaii Foodbank. The first 200 participants to bring donations will receive a free Da Hui sticker.

Email Mahina Chillingworth at mahina@dahui.com for more information or message her on Facebook.

This is an alcohol- and drug-free event.

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Green Homes at Lualualei go native

By
November 6th, 2013



Planting native Hawaiian plants at the Green Homes at Lualualei. Courtesy image.

Planting native Hawaiian plants at the Green Homes at Lualualei. Courtesy image.

The Green Homes at Lualualei just got a little greener, with the addition of native plants in late October.

Volunteers planted several native Hawaiian plants at the affordable housing project's landscape, including ‘akulikuli, naio and ‘ohai, following a special briefing by Rick Barboza of Hui Ku Maoli Ola. The plants were specifically selected because they are native to the leeward Oahu area and do well in its environment.

The Green Homes at Lualualei, by developer R.J. Martin, are equipped with solar photovoltaic systems, a water purification system and insulation to keep the heat out. The community offers 25 affordable homes in all, priced below the median average. The three- and four-bedroom homes range from about $250,000 to $350.000.

Last summer, two families moved into the community.

To learn more, visit www.greenhomeshi.com.

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