Finally, recycling bins

August 19th, 2013
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The city is inviting schools, community groups and volunteers to help make and install wire HI-5 bins around the island. Photo from Honolulu's Department of Environmental Services website, www.opala.org/solid_waste/learning_center/DIY_HI5_Public_Recycling_Containers.html.

Photo from www.opala.org.

Well, it's about time.

The city and county of Honolulu's Department of Environmental Services has not only embraced the concept of DIY (do-it-yourself) recycling bins, but is inviting schools, community groups and volunteers to help make and install them at district parks, beaches and bus stops.

The city's goal is to install 1,000 of the HI-5 recycling bins around the island this year.

This month, Beach Environmental Awareness Campaign Hawai‘i was one of the first groups to step up to the plate and partner with the city for the project. B.E.A.C.H. brought together volunteers to learn how to make the wire recycling bins that they will install around Oahu while educating the public about the city's new no-smoking rules.

The wire recycling HI-5 bins were actually the original idea of University of Hawaii professors Gaye Chan and Nandita Sharma as part of their non-profit Eating In Public project.

Read their blog at www.eating-in-public.blogspot.com.

They first made the bins in 2006, installing the first one in front of their home. The simple wire mesh bins come with a sign that says "HI-5/ Take, Leave, Whatevas..." The idea caught on and they were invited to give workshops.

The self-serve bins attach to existing trash containers to help keep recyclables separate. The city will not be picking up the recyclables.

Volunteers from Beach Environmental Awareness Campaign Hawaii attend a city workshop to learn how to construct DIY HI-5 recycling bins. Photo courtesy B.E.A.C.H.

Volunteers from Beach Environmental Awareness Campaign Hawaii attend a city workshop to learn how to construct DIY HI-5 recycling bins. Photo courtesy B.E.A.C.H.

The city's Department of Environmental Services is inviting volunteers who will commit to making between 50 to 200 of the recycling bins (city provides a workshop on how to make them) and then helping to install them at beaches, parks and bus stops around the island. The locations are to be documented on a web-based map. The city will provide the wire and signage for completed bins.

It would be great to see more of the bins at Oahu's most popular beach parks, like Hanauma Bay and Ala Moana Beach Park.

If you are nterested in participating, call 768--3200 or email tfarnsworth@honolulu.gov.

The following is Eating in Public's motto for the HI-5 bins:

TAKE = act without shame

LEAVE = share without condition

WHATEVAS = trust without apology

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