A Day on the Land

August 5th, 2013
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A team of volunteers from HMSA helped clean graffiti off of stone bridges in Moanalua Valley as part of The Trust for Public Land's community work day Saturday. Courtesy photo.

A team of volunteers from HMSA helped clean graffiti off of stone bridges in Moanalua Valley as part of The Trust for Public Land's community work day Saturday. Courtesy photo.

More than 100 volunteers joined The Trust for Public Land for its community workday in Moanalua Valley on Saturday.

They cleared trails of leaves, branches and muddy debris strewn by recent high winds and rain, spread gravel along trail paths and painted over graffiti on stone bridges. It was all a part of "A Day on the Land," an effort to preserve an important, natural habitat with a rich, cultural heritage.

About 50 HECO volunteers helped spread gravel along the trail in Moanalua Valley as part of community work day. Courtesy photo.

HECO brought about 50 volunteers to help spread gravel along the trail in Moanalua Valley. Courtesy photo.

Volunteers braved both humidity and mosquitoes during their efforts Saturday.

The work day was sponsored by companies including Alaska Airlines, Alexander & Baldwin, Central Pacific Bank, First Insurance Co. of Hawaii, the Hawaiian Electric Co., HMSA, Makai Ocean Engineering, Servco Foundation and Title Guaranty.

HECO brought about 50 volunteers, some of whom brought their families, to the community work day. It was an opportunity to work side-by-side with the community and hike into areas of Moanalua Valley that are rarely accessible to the public, said HECO's director of education and consumer affairs Ka‘iulani de Silva.

Moanalua Valley is one of the last, truly open spaces in urban Honolulu (which narrowly escaped becoming a potential corridor for the H-3 freeway as well as residential development). It's home to five distinct forest types and more than nine miles of streams. The valley is  a critical habitat for endangered plants and animals, including the elepaio, and home to cultural important sites including a famed pohaku (stone) carved with petroglyphs of winged warriors.

The Trust for Public Land purchased Moanalua Valley in 2007 and transferred it to the state's Forest Reserve system where it will be protected in perpetuity.

More than 100 volunteers showed up to help at the Trust for Public Land's A Day on the Land at Moanalua Valley. Courtesy photo.

More than 100 volunteers showed up to help at the Trust for Public Land's A Day on the Land at Moanalua Valley. Courtesy photo.

Linda Howe from A & B helps clean graffiti from a bridge at Moanalua Valley as part of The Trust for Public Land's community work day. Courtesy photo.

Linda Howe from A & B helps clean graffiti from a bridge at Moanalua Valley as part of The Trust for Public Land's community work day. Courtesy photo. To learn of more community workdays, visit www.tpl.org/hawaii or call 524-8694.

Volunteers from HECO lent a helping hand at a Day on the Land in Moanalua Valley. Courtesy photo.

Volunteers from HECO lent a helping hand at a Day on the Land in Moanalua Valley. Courtesy photo.

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