Archive for May, 2012

Learn how plastic impacts your health

May 28th, 2012
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B.E.A.C.H. co-founder Suzanne Frazer holds what appears to be a plastic shampoo bottle that has broken down in the ocean and washed up on the Kahuku shoreline. She will talk about plastic's impact on our health and environment tomorrow.

B.E.A.C.H. co-founder Suzanne Frazer holds a plastic shampoo bottle that appears to have been eaten up in the ocean before washing up on the Kahuku shoreline. She will talk about plastic's impact on our health and environment tomorrow.

Plastic is all around us — and it has an impact on your health, marine life and environment.

Learn more about the chemicals in plastic, the impacts of marine debris on marine life and what simple steps you can take to protect your health as well as the environment from the Beach Environmental Awareness Campaign Hawaii (B.E.A.C.H.) from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. tomorrow (Tuesday, May 29) in Kailua.

B.E.A.C.H. co-founder Suzanne Frazer offers the free educational presentation"Plastic: Impacts on your Health, Marine Life & The Environment" at the Harold K.L. Castle Foundation Community Meeting Room at 131 Hekili St. Suite 111 in Kailua. Whole Foods Market Kailua will provide some light refreshments.

If you miss tomorrow's lecture, there will be another one at the same place from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 28.

Also, Whole Foods Market Kailua has chosen B.E.A.C.H. to be the recipient of their first Recycle Your Change. Customers are invited to donate their loose change at the registers or make larger donations through the registers from now until June 30.

Call 393-2168 to RSVP or visit www.b-e-a-c-h.org to learn more.

2012 Humpback Whale Ocean Contest winners

May 25th, 2012
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Congratulations to the following student winners of the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary's 2012 Humpback Whale Month Ocean Contest.

Students from kindergarten to eighth grade around the globe were invited to express their insights, observations and understanding of the marine environment through original artwork, poems and short stories. There were about 300 entries.

All entrants became members of the Ocean Guardian Kids Club and received an ocean education packet.

Here are the art winners by category. To see all of the entries, go to hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov.

Drawing of a mother whale and baby by Connor Reid, Gabriola Elementary, British Columbia, 1st place winner in the K to Grade 2 art category.

Drawing of a mother whale and baby by Connor Reid, Gabriola Elementary, British Columbia, 1st place winner in the K to Grade 2 art category.

  • Art – Kindergarten to Grade 2
  • 1st: Connor Reid, Gabriola Elementary, British Columbia
  • 2nd: Joshua Dabashi, Island School, Kaua‘i
  • 3rd: Skyy Sekimoto, Nuuanu Elementary, O‘ahu
  • 4th: Franchesca Marie Matahum, St Anthony School, O‘ahu
  • 5th: Kyle Ching, Iolani School, O‘ahu
Drawing by Lauren Ishikawa of Iolani School, 1st place winner in the Grade 3 to 4 art category.

Drawing by Lauren Ishikawa of Iolani School, 1st place winner in the Grade 3 to 4 art category.

  • Art - Grade 3 to Grade 4
  • 1st: Lauren Ishikawa, Iolani School, O‘ahu
  • 2nd: Eunbi Choi, Saipan International, Saipan
  • 3rd: Kayley Dombriones, Hanalei Elementary, Kaua‘i
  • 4th: Chloe Okimura, Iolani School, O‘ahu
  • 5th: Zoe Omura, Iolani School, O‘ahu
Drawing by Randy Namohala and Klaryssa Kado of Kapolei Middle. 1st place winners of Grade 5 to 8 art category.

Drawing by Klaryssa Kado of Kapolei Middle. 1st place winners of Grade 5 to 8 art category.

Drawing by Sienna Namohala, 7th grade, Kapolei Middle School. Also first place in grades 5 through 8. Courtesy image.

Drawing by Sienna Namohala at Kapolei Middle School. Also 1st place in the grade 5 to 8 category.

  • Art - Grade 5 to Grade 8
  • 1st: Sienna Namohala, Kapolei Middle, O‘ahu AND Klaryssa Kado, Kapolei Middle, O‘ahu
  • 2nd: Malie Fox, St John Vianney, O‘ahu
  • 3rd: Yoa RaSung, Iolani School, O‘ahu
  • 4th: Kyra Tan, Iolani School, O‘ahu
  • 5th: Jake Flores, Kipp Coastal Village Middle, Texas

Here's a link to the winning poems and essays, with a poem by Kawika Akina below.

5th Place, Grade 5 to 8
Kawika Akina
Kahuku Elementary School, O'ahu

Humpback Whales
They are as long as a bus
They have ears like us
They have bumps all over
They don't need a makeover
Humpbacks love singing
They also love eating
They go 25 knots per hour
And they don't need a shower
They have a tail or fluke
And they will not puke
They eat small fish and krill
But they do not need a grill
A whale isn't a fool
It is just plain cool.

Hawaii's big tree champions

May 22nd, 2012
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Coconut tree in Molokai is one of nation's Big Tree winners. DLNR Photo.

Coconut tree in Molokai is one of nation's Big Tree champions. DLNR Photo.

Hawaii is home to six big tree champions, which are now recognized by the National Register of Big Trees, a nonprofit conservation organization that advocates for the protection and expansion of America's forests.

And (drum roll), the six big tree champions are:

* Acacia Koa in Kona Hema Preserve, Hawai‘i
* Two Coconut in Kapuaiwa Coconut Beach Park, Moloka‘i
* Hau tree at Hulihe‘e Palace, Hawaii
* ‘A‘ali‘i at Maui Nui Botanical Gardens, Maui
* Manele/Soapberry at Bird Park/Kipuka Puaulu, Volcano National Park, Hawaii

All of the trees, with the exception of the koa, are accessible to the public. Click here for a map and photos of the trees.

“With forests covering approximately 749 million acres in the U.S., it’s a special honor to have a tree recognized as the biggest of its kind,” said Paul Conry, Administrator of the Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW). “In a year with 14 different billion-dollar weather disasters, America’s biggest trees proved that they’re survivors. For trees to grow bigger than their competition, it usually means that they’ve been protected and nurtured over the years. And, they’ve been lucky. Having grown into large, healthy trees, they now do their own job of protecting and nurturing the plants, trees, wildlife and even humans in their habitats.”

Since more than half of Hawaii's original forest has been lost, immediate action is needed to protect the trees and forests that are essential to Hawaii's water supply and provide many other benefits. Learn about the state's plan to save Hawaii's forests at hawaii.gov/dlnr/rain, which also includes a short video, “The Rain Follows the Forest.”

“We hope that including Hawai‘i on the national Big Trees register will help educate and encourage conservation of our native and culturally important trees,” said Sheri Mann, DOFAW Cooperative Resource Management Forester. “It is our goal to eventually create our own State of Hawai‘i Big Trees Program.”

Anyone can nominate a big tree for recognition in the program. Currently, 21 species are eligible in Hawaii.

To nominate a tree, three measurements are needed: Trunk Circumference (inches), Height (feet), and Average Crown Spread (feet). These are combined to assign the tree a score. DOFAW staff also needs to know the exact location to verify any candidates.

To learn more about the specific measuring requirements please review the guidelines at the American Forests website.

Please send measurements, GPS coordinates or specific directions to a candidate big tree to:

Sheri Mann, CRMF
1151 Punchbowl Street, Room 325
Honolulu, HI  96813

Or email her at Sheri.S.Mann@hawaii.gov

Recycling plastic lids and caps

May 4th, 2012
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Dozens of plastic bottle caps that I've collected over the months to be recycled.

Dozens of plastic bottle caps collected over the months to be recycled. Photo by Nina Wu.

It's amazing how many plastic caps you can collect in a month — they're on half-gallon milk cartons, Trop50 juices, water bottles, pretty much any beverage that comes in a plastic bottle, shampoo and conditioner bottles, vitamins, peanut butter jars and Happy Baby food pouches. The list goes on.

Beach Environmental Awareness Campaign Hawaii (B.E.A.C.H.) is making an effort to recycle the plastic caps and lids. Mark your calendars if you, too, have been collecting plastic lids and caps. The non-profit and student volunteers will be collecting plastic caps and lids for recycling on Saturday, May 5 and Saturday, May 12.

>> 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Saturday, May 5. Ahuimanu Elementary School, 47-470 Hui Aeko Pl. in Kaneohe.

>> 9 a.m. to 11;30 a.m. on Saturday, May 12. Kaimuki Middle School, 631 18th Ave.

For updates on plastic caps and lids recycling collection dates and times, visit www.b-e-a-c-h.org.

This effort to reduce plastic caps in the environment and help save sea birds is an initiative of the Beach Environmental Awareness Campaign Hawaii and supported by the following partners: Matson, 5 Star Transportation, Young Brothers and ETA Logistics.

Free Educational Presentation

Also, from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on May 29 and June 28, listen to an educational and inspirational presentation by B.E.A.C.H. co-founder Suzanne Frazer on the issue of plastic in our environment and how it is both harmful to our health as well as marine life.

Learn about chemicals in plastic, the impacts of marine debris on marine life and what simple steps you can take to protect your health as well as that of the environment.

The presentations will take place at the Harold K.L. Castle Foundation Community Meeting Room, 131 Hekili St. Suite 111 in Kailua. Light refreshments provided by Whole Foods Market Kailua. Please RSVP by phone to 393-2168.